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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Albany, California » Western Regional Research Center » Produce Safety and Microbiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #355952

Research Project: Molecular Identification and Characterization of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens Associated with Foods

Location: Produce Safety and Microbiology Research

Title: Complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter marinus type strain JCM 15502

Author
item Miller, William - Bill
item Yee, Emma
item Huynh, Steven
item Parker, Craig

Submitted to: Microbiology Resource Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/3/2018
Publication Date: 10/25/2018
Citation: Miller, W.G., Yee, E., Huynh, S., Parker, C. 2018. Complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter marinus type strain JCM 15502. MICROBIOLOGY RESOURCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 7(16):e01269-18. https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01269-18.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.01269-18

Interpretive Summary: Members of the genus Arcobacter have been isolated from a wide range of hosts and environments. Arcobacters have been recovered from freshwater, seawater and contaminated environmental waters. Additionally, several Arcobacter species have been recovered from shellfish. Arcobacter marinus was recovered in Korea from a blended sample containing surface seawater from the Sea of Japan, seaweed and a starfish. This study reports the first closed chromosomal sequence for the A. marinus type strain. Consistent with its isolation from a seawater/seaweed/starfish slurry, A. marinus contains genes that would permit a greater degree of salt tolerance, as might be necessary for growth in marine habitats. Additionally, this strain contains several genes for the biosynthesis of vitamin B12. An unusual feature of A. marinus is the presence of several genes that code for proteins that could potentially modify the backbone of the A. marinus chromosomal DNA molecule, substituting sulfur for one of the oxygen atoms present in the backbone. The outcome of modifying the A. marinus chromosome through sulfur substitution is unknown, although in other organisms such a modification may protect the cells from oxidative damage.

Technical Abstract: Arcobacter species are often recovered from marine environments and are isolated from both seawater and shellfish. Arcobacter marinus was recovered from the homogenate of a sample containing surface seawater, seaweed and a starfish. This study describes the whole-genome sequence of the A. marinus type strain JCM 15502 (=CL-S1T =KCCM 90072T).