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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #355931

Research Project: Improved Biologically-Based Methods for Insect Pest Management of Crop Insect Pests

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research

Title: Comparison of pheromone trap design and lures for Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Togo and genetic characterisation of moths caught

Author
item Meagher, Robert - Rob
item Agboka, Komi - University Of Lome
item Tounou, Agbeko - University Of Ghana
item Koffi, Djima - University Of Ghana
item Agbevohia, Koffi - University Of Lome
item Amouze, Tomfei - University Of Lome
item Adjevi, Kossi - University Of Lome
item Nagoshi, Rodney

Submitted to: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/29/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The fall armyworm moth (FAW) is a serious pest of row and vegetable crops in the U.S. and in much of the Western Hemisphere. This pest has been recently discovered in sub-Saharan Africa and poses a severe threat to small-holder farmers who grow maize. An important tool for monitoring fall armyworm in the United States is pheromone trapping, which would be of value for use with African populations. Researchers from USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL along with colleagues from the Universities of Lomé and Ghana, conducted field experiments to assess the efficacy of pheromone traps in Togo. The objectives were to compare capture of male fall armyworm using three different commercially-available pheromone lures and three different trap designs with the intent to identify and compare trap-lure combinations with respect to sensitivity, specificity, and cost. Almost 400 moths were captured during the experiment. Differences were found in the number of moths captured, with a locally-designed trap performing well. Results suggested that the local trap or a bucket trap, with a two-component pheromone lure, will provide valuable monitoring information on the fall armyworm for African farmers.

Technical Abstract: Fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)] is a noctuid moth pest of grain and vegetable crops endemic to the Western Hemisphere that has recently become widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. There is a strong expectation of significant damage to maize and other crops, and the potential of further dispersal to southern Europe and the Middle East. An important tool for monitoring S. frugiperda in the United States is pheromone trapping, which would be of value for use with African populations. Field experiments were conducted in the African nation of Togo to compare capture of male fall armyworm using three different commercially-available pheromone lures and three different trap designs. The objectives were to identify trap-lure combinations with respect to sensitivity, specificity, and cost. Almost 400 moths were captured during the experiment. Significant differences were found in the number of S. frugiperda moths captured in the different trap designs and with the three pheromone lures. Differences were also found in the number of nontarget moths captured with each lure. The merits of each trap-lure combination are discussed with respect for use in Africa. Overall, the genetic characterization of the pheromone trap collections indicated a consistent distribution of genetic markers from 2016 to 2017, suggesting a population at or near equilibrium.