Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania » Eastern Regional Research Center » Sustainable Biofuels and Co-products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #350529

Research Project: Enable New Marketable, Value-added Coproducts to Improve Biorefining Profitability

Location: Sustainable Biofuels and Co-products Research

Title: Effect of various hydrocolloids on the physical and fermentation properties of dough

Author
item Lia, Jinxin - Beijing Advanced Innovation Center For Food Nutrition And Human Health, Beijing Technology & Busine
item Zhu, Yunping - Beijing Advanced Innovation Center For Food Nutrition And Human Health, Beijing Technology & Busine
item Yadav, Madhav
item Li, Jinlong - Beijing Advanced Innovation Center For Food Nutrition And Human Health, Beijing Technology & Busine

Submitted to: Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/25/2018
Publication Date: 7/26/2018
Citation: Lia, J., Zhu, Y., Yadav, M.P., Li, J. 2018. Effect of various hydrocolloids on the physical and fermentation properties of dough. Food Chemistry. 271:165-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.07.192.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.07.192

Interpretive Summary: Dough preparation is the first and critical step for making most wheat flour products. Dough performance plays a key role in the quality of the final food products. Several food additives are used in many dough products, which prompted us to study the effect of various hydrocolloids (12 carbohydrate- and 4 protein-based hydrocolloids) on enhancing dough properties and the quality of its products. We found that carbohydrate based hydrocolloids, also known as food gums, enhanced the structure of the dough. Specifically, the carbohydrate-based hydrocolloids with a linear structure and high viscosity are highly effective in making a strong dough in comparison to protein-based hydrocolloids. It was found that an optimum interaction of hydrocolloids and gluten proteins present in flour makes a strong and stable dough. Thus hydrocolloids can be used in many processed food products to improve stability (gelling, thickening, emulsifying etc.), texture and appearance. They can be used for diverse purposes in baking industries, such as slowing the staling (drying-out) rate, improving texture properties, moisture retention and product acceptability. Viscosity is one of the most widely used properties in food applications. In this respect, these hydrocolloid and starch composites can be used in foods where oil or fat content has to be reduced. Hydrocolloids have a great effect on the viscosity of starch polymers, so their mixture with starch can control the viscosity of the food system, which in turn helps to replace fat or oil in the final products. Usually hydrocolloids are non-caloric, so they may be used as a low calorie replacement for high caloric carbohydrate additives, which are used as thickeners, flavor carriers and suspension stabilizers in a wide variety of food products. These findings will benefit U. S. food hydrocolloids producers by adding value and creating additional market for their products.

Technical Abstract: The influence of various hydrocolloids, food gums, on the physical properties of dough was investigated to expand their applications in food products. Sixteen hydrocolloids (12 carbohydrate-based and 4 protein-based hydrocolloids) at several concentrations were added to dough and their rheological, pasting and fermentation properties were studied. We found that 0.2% sodium alginate (ALG), carrageenan (CGN), xanthan gum (XG), guar gum (GG) and locust bean gum (LBG) resulted in a strengthened dough. But ALG (0.6%-1%), pectin (0.2%-1%) and konjac glucomannan (KGM) yielded weaker dough. The chemical interactions study suggested that pectin and KGM induced the highest content of chemical bonds. The degree of recrystallization of amylopectin was decreased in the presence of 1% ALG, 0.6%-1% CGN and pectin, as well as 0.2%-1% KGM during starch retrogradation. In the fermentation studies, it was found that pectin, GG and agaric gum (AG) had positive effects, resulting in higher stability of dough pore space and gas retention. All protein hydrocolloids exhibited a negative effect on dough quality. Overall, except for AG (a highly branched and low viscous hydrocolloid), other polysaccharide based hydrocolloids with linear chain and higher viscosity have a remarkable effect on the enhancing gluten network. The interaction between hydrocolloids and gluten proteins was also crucial for dough properties, as exceptionally strong interactions caused disaggregation and instability of gluten network.