Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » WHGQ » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348906

Research Project: Soft Kernel Durum Wheat: Removing the Culinary Constraints of this Genetically Rich Cereal Species

Location: Wheat Health, Genetics, and Quality Research

Title: Enhanced gluten properties in soft kernel durum wheat

Author
item Morris, Craig
item Ibba, Maria Itria - Washington State University
item Boehm, Jeffrey - Washington State University
item Kiszonas, Alecia

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/3/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Soft kernel durum wheat is a relatively recent development (Morris et al. 2011 Crop Sci. 51:114). The soft kernel trait exerts profound effects on kernel texture, flour milling including break flour yield, milling energy, and starch damage, and dough water absorption (DWA). With the caveat of reduced DWA, the soft kernel trait seems to exert little effect on dough strength and bread baking quality. Pasta quality is equal to or better than normal durum. To enhance dough strength and its effect on bread baking, we combined existing translocations involving the Glu-D1 High Molecular Weight Glutenin subunits Dx2+Dy12 and Dx5+Dy10 with the soft kernel trait. Resulting lines with Dx2+Dy12 (full sibs with or without the translocation) had increased dough strength: Mixograph Time to peak increased 2 min, Peak Height increased 6 units, Work under the curve increased 80.7 units, and Width of the curve 2 min after peak increased 6.1 units. Flour SDS sedimentation volume increased from 9.4 to 14.6 mL/g, and bread loaf volume increased 105 cm3. Soft durum lines with Dx5+Dy10 (+/- full sibs) had markedly increased dough strength: Mixograph Time to peak increased 4.7 min, Peak Height increased 6 units, Work under the curve increased 192.9 units, and the Width of the curve 2 min after peak increased 5.3 units. Flour SDS sedimentation volume increased from 6.4 mL/g. However, loaf volume decreased 97 cm3. The doughs appeared to be too strong and ‘bucky’ and not sufficiently extensible for optimum loaf volume expression. Research is focused on better understanding the role of the glutenins in achieving a balance of extensibility and elasticity, with the aim of expanding the utilization of durum wheat. The ability to produce fine textured flours with low starch damage on standard roller mills will enhance the expanded use of this important food crop.