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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » ABADRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348723

Research Project: Ecology and Control of Insect Vectors

Location: Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Quantification of vector and host competence for Japanese encephalitis virus: a systematic review of the literature

Author
item Oliverira, Ana
item Etcheverry Hernandez, Luciana
item Strathe, Erin
item Mcvey, D Scott - Scott
item Piaggio, Jose
item Cohnstaedt, Lee
item Cernicchiaro, Natalia

Submitted to: Preventive Veterinary Medicine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/8/2018
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a virus of the Flavivirus genus that may result in encephalitis in human hosts. This vector-borne zoonosis occurs in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and an intentional or inadvertent introduction into the United States (US) will have major public health and economic consequences. The objective of this study was to gather, appraise, and synthesize primary research literature to identify and quantify vector and host competence for JEV, using a systematic review (SR) of the literature. After defining the research question, we performed a search in selected electronic databases and journals. The title and abstract of the identified articles were screened for relevance using a set of exclusion and inclusion criteria, and relevant articles were subjected to a risk of bias assessment followed by data extraction. Data were extracted from 171 peer-reviewed articles. Most studies were observational studies (59.1%) and reported vector competence (60.2%). The outcome measures reported pertained to transmission efficiency, host preference, and vector susceptibility to infection within vector competence; and susceptibility to infection within host competence. Regarding vector competence, the proportion of JEV infection reported across all 149 mosquito species in all observational studies ranged from 0 to 100%. In experimental studies, infection, dissemination, and transmission rates varied between 0 and 100%. Minimum infection rates (MIR) varied between 0 and 333.3 per 1,000 mosquitoes. Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) values ranged from 0 to 53.8 per 1,000 mosquitoes. The host species in which mosquitoes mostly fed consisted of pigs and cattle (84 blood meals). As for host competence, the proportion of JEV infection varied between 0 (in rabbits, reptiles, and amphibians) and 88.9% (cattle). This SR presents comprehensive data on JEV vector and host competence, which can be used to quantify risks associated with the ntroduction of JEV into the US.

Technical Abstract: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a virus of the Flavivirus genus that may result in encephalitis in human hosts. This vector-borne zoonosis occurs in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and an intentional or inadvertent introduction into the United States (US) will have major public health and economic consequences. The objective of this study was to gather, appraise, and synthesize primary research literature to identify and quantify vector and host competence for JEV, using a systematic review (SR) of the literature. After defining the research question, we performed a search in selected electronic databases and journals. The title and abstract of the identified articles were screened for relevance using a set of exclusion and inclusion criteria, and relevant articles were subjected to a risk of bias assessment followed by data extraction. Data were extracted from 171 peer-reviewed articles. Most studies were observational studies (59.1%) and reported vector competence (60.2%). The outcome measures reported pertained to transmission efficiency, host preference, and vector susceptibility to infection within vector competence; and susceptibility to infection within host competence. Regarding vector competence, the proportion of JEV infection reported across all 149 mosquito species in all observational studies ranged from 0 to 100%. In experimental studies, infection, dissemination, and transmission rates varied between 0 and 100%. Minimum infection rates (MIR) varied between 0 and 333.3 per 1,000 mosquitoes. Maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) values ranged from 0 to 53.8 per 1,000 mosquitoes. The host species in which mosquitoes mostly fed consisted of pigs and cattle (84 blood meals). As for host competence, the proportion of JEV infection varied between 0 (in rabbits, reptiles, and amphibians) and 88.9% (cattle). This SR presents comprehensive data on JEV vector and host competence, which can be used to quantify risks associated with the introduction of JEV into the US.