Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Hilo, Hawaii » Daniel K. Inouye U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center » Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347371

Research Project: Detection, Control and Area-wide Management of Fruit Flies and Other Quarantine Pests of Tropical/Subtropical Crops

Location: Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research

Title: A review of recorded host plants of Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera (Bactrocera)dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), version 3.0

Author
item Liquido, Nicanor - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Mcquate, Grant
item Birnbaum, Amanda - North Carolina State University
item Hanlin, Megan - North Carolina State University
item Nakamichi, Kelly - North Carolina State University
item Inskeep, Jess - University Of Hawaii
item Ching, Alexander - North Carolina State University
item Marnell, Sarah - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Kurashima, Rick - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)

Submitted to: USDA CPHST Online Database
Publication Type: Literature Review
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/5/2017
Publication Date: 9/5/2017
Citation: Liquido, N.J., Mcquate, G.T., Birnbaum, A.L., Hanlin, M.A., Nakamichi, K.A., Inskeep, J.R., Ching, A.J., Marnell, S.A., Kurashima, R.S. 2017. A review of recorded host plants of Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera (Bactrocera)dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), version 3.0. USDA CPHST Online Database. Available: https://coffhi.cphst.org/.

Interpretive Summary: The Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is a tephritid fruit fly species found in many tropical areas. USDA-APHIS regulates the interstate movement of the fruits and vegetables subject to infestation by oriental fruit fly from all quarantine areas in the United States. Presented herein is a comprehensive update of the reported host plants of oriental fruit fly, developed to provide APHIS with recent scientific evidence on reported host plants from worldwide literature. Oriental fruit fly is associated with a total of 632 plant taxa; of these, 481 taxa, belonging to 212 genera in 79 families, have validated records of infestation under natural field conditions. Plant families with the most suitable hosts of oriental fruit fly are the fig family (Moraceae; 38 taxa), the citrus family (Rutaceae; 37 taxa), the tomato family (Solanaceae; 33 taxa), and the squash family (Cucurbitaceae; 29 taxa). Additionally, there are 151 taxa, belonging to 96 genera in 51 families, with “undetermined host status” for oriental fruit fly, for which further data is needed to assess their status as hosts. The compiled information summarized here is currently being used in updating and revising the list of regulated host plants of oriental fruit fly, which will be published as a Federal Order. It is a product of the USDA Compendium of Fruit Fly Host Information, a Farm Bill project.

Technical Abstract: Bactrocera (Bactrocera) dorsalis (Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), commonly known as the Oriental fruit fly, is regulated through the Plant Protection Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7701-7772) and relevant Parts and Subparts of the Code of Federal Regulations (7 CFR – Agriculture). Presented herein is a comprehensive update of the reported host plants of Bactrocera dorsalis, including those that have been reported for its junior synonyms: Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White. Bactrocera dorsalis is associated with a total of 632 plant taxa; of these, 481 taxa belonging to 212 genera in 79 families have validated records of infestation under natural field conditions. Additionally, there are 151 taxa belonging to 96 genera in 51 families with “undetermined host status” to B.dorsalis. The “undetermined host status” category is conferred to a plant taxon that has no valid record of infestation under natural field conditions, and its association with B.dorsalis is based on reported laboratory infestation, interception at a port of entry, or mere listing as a host without any accompanying verifiable data. The compiled information summarized here is currently being used in updating and revising the list of regulated host plants of B.dorsalis, which will be published as a Federal Order. It is a product of the USDA Compendium of Fruit Fly Host Information, a Farm Bill project.