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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #346250

Research Project: Improving Genetic Predictions in Dairy Animals Using Phenotypic and Genomic Information

Location: Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory

Title: Extreme antagonistic pleiotropy effects of DGAT1 on fat, milk and protein yields

Author
item JIANG, JICAI - University Of Maryland
item MA, LI - University Of Maryland
item PRAKAPENKA, DZIANIS - University Of Minnesota
item Tooker, Melvin
item Vanraden, Paul
item Cole, John
item DA, YANG - University Of Minnesota

Submitted to: World Congress of Genetics Applied in Livestock Production
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/7/2018
Publication Date: 2/7/2018
Citation: Jiang, J., Ma, L., Prakapenka, D., Tooker, M.E., Van Raden, P.M., Cole, J.B., Da, Y. 2018. Extreme antagonistic pleiotropy effects of DGAT1 on fat, milk and protein yields. World Congress of Genetics Applied in Livestock Production. Auckland, New Zealand, Feb. 11–16, Vol. Electron. Poster Sess.–Mol. Genet. 3, p. 142.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: A large-scale analysis using 294,079 first lactation Holstein cows, as well as a group of contemporary Holsteins and a Holstein line unselected since 1964, were used to study the genetic architecture associated with a mutation in the DGAT1 gene that has large effects on milk production. The ‘G’ allele has effects on several different traits of economic importance, with positive effects on fat yield and negative effects on milk and protein yields. The ‘A’ allele of DGAT1 has positive effects on milk and protein yields and negative effect on fat yield. The largest, positive effects on milk yield were seen in the LY6E-ARC and EEF1D genes, and the alleles with positive effects on milk yield had higher frequencies in the contemporary Holsteins than in the unselected Holsteins. DGAT1 allele frequencies have remained unchanged since the mid 1980s, possibly because of the antagonism between fat and milk yields.