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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » National Germplasm Resources Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344064

Research Project: Characterizing and Detecting Pathogens to Ensure Safe Exchange of Plant Germplasm

Location: National Germplasm Resources Laboratory

Title: First report of Beet western yellows virus infecting Epiphyllum spp

Author
item Eicholtz, Matthew
item Grinstead, Sam
item Wu, Liping - Nanchang University
item Kinard, Gary
item Li, Ruhui

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/11/2017
Publication Date: 12/12/2017
Citation: Eicholtz, M.I., Grinstead, S.C., Wu, L., Kinard, G.R., Li, R. 2017. First report of Beet western yellows virus infecting Epiphyllum spp. Plant Disease. https://doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-08-17-1238-PDN.

Interpretive Summary: Orchid cactus (Epiphyllum spp.) is a group of epiphytic plants in the cactus family that are widely grown for their flowers. In this study, Beet western yellow virus (BWYV) was identified in a hybrid orchid cactus by a sequencing technology. The nearly complete genomic sequence of the virus was determined and analysis indicates it is a novel strain of BWYV. Subsequent testing detected the same virus in two more hybrid orchid cacti. BWYV is transmitted by aphids and infects a wide range of crops. However, this is the first report of the BWYV infection in Epiphyllum spp. This information is useful to scientists who study this group of viruses, especially in ornamental crops.

Technical Abstract: Beet western yellow virus (BWYV) was identified from an orchid cactus (Epiphyllum spp.) hybrid without obvious symptoms by high-throughput sequencing. The nearly complete genomic sequence of 5,458 nucleotides of the virus was determined. The isolate has the highest nucleotide sequence identity (93%) to a BWYV isolate infecting Nepenthes mirabilis. The virus was graft transmitted to a hybrid Epiphyllum that tested negative for ten other cactus viruses. BWYV was also detected from two additional asymptomatic orchid cactus hybrids. To our knowledge, this is the first report of BWYV in the orchid cactus.