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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Crop Bioprotection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342671

Research Project: Development of Production and Formulation Technologies for Microbial Biopesticides in Conjunction with the Development of Attractants and Repellents for Invasive Insect Pests

Location: Crop Bioprotection Research

Title: Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie2, Cry2Ac7, and Cry7Ab3 proteins against Anticarsia gemmatalis, Chrysodeixis includens and Ceratoma trifurcata

Author
item Mushtaq, Rubina - University Of The Punjab
item Behle, Robert
item Liu, Rongmei - Northeast Agricultural University, China
item Niu, Lin - Huazhong Agricultural University
item Song, Ping - Agricultural University Of Hebei
item Shakoori, Abdul - University Of The Punjab
item Jurat-fuentes, Juan Luis - University Of Tennessee

Submitted to: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/11/2017
Publication Date: 9/15/2017
Citation: Mushtaq, R., Behle, R.W., Liu, R., Niu, L., Song, P., Shakoori, A.R., Jurat-Fuentes, J. 2017. Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie2, Cry2Ac7, and Cry7Ab3 proteins against Anticarsia gemmatalis, Chrysodeixis includens and Ceratoma trifurcata. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 150(2017):70-72.

Interpretive Summary: Transgenic soybeans that produce an insecticidal protein from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (“Bt”) have successfully controlled larvae of the velvet bean caterpillar and the soybean looper, but with the threat that these insects could develop resistance to the single protein toxin. This research evaluated several diverse Bt proteins and identified those able to provide additional pest control and make it harder for pests to develop resistance to these transgenic plants. Successful development of crop plants with multiple protein toxins will improve the sustainability of this environmental safe technology and provide economical pest control for years to come.

Technical Abstract: Transgenic soybeans producing the Cry1Ac insecticidal protein from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (or “Bt”) are currently used to control larvae of the velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner) and the soybean looper [Chrysodeixis includens (Walker)]. The main threat to the sustainability of this technology is the development of resistance, which could be delayed by using pyramiding of diverse Bt proteins. However, the list of Bt proteins with reported significant activity against A. Transgenic soybean producing the Cry1Ac insecticidal protein from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis is used to control larvae of the velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner) and the soybean looper [Chrysodeixis includens (Walker)]. The main threat to the sustainability of this technology is the development of resistance, which could be delayed by using pyramiding of diverse Bt insecticidal genes. We report high activity of Cry2Ac7 and Vip3Aa11 but not Cry1Ie2 against larvae of A. gemmatalis and C. includens. In addition, we also report anti-feeding activity of Cry1Ie2 and Cry7Ab3 in adults of the bean leaf beetle [Ceratoma trifurcata (Foster)], an alternative pest of soybean.