Skip to main content
ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Bio-oils Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340879

Research Project: Replacement of Petroleum Products Utilizing Off-Season Rotational Crops

Location: Bio-oils Research

Title: Agronomic performance of the novel oilseed crop Euphorbia lagascae Spreng., (Euphorbiaceae) in southwestern Ontario

Author
item Chakraborty, Sonhita - University Of Toronto
item Todd, Jim - University Of Guelph
item Isbell, Terry
item Van Acker, Rene - University Of Guelph

Submitted to: Industrial Crops and Products
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/1/2017
Publication Date: 11/4/2017
Citation: Chakraborty, S., Todd, J., Isbell, T., Van Acker, R.C. 2018. Agronomic performance of the novel oilseed crop Euphorbia lagascae Spreng., (Euphorbiaceae) in southwestern Ontario. Industrial Crops and Products. 111:865-870.

Interpretive Summary: An epoxy oil, Euphorbia lagascae, naturally produces vernolic acid which is an epoxy fatty acid that can be used as a plasticizer. Field trials conducted at locations in Simcoe and Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in 2014-2016 showed that these oilseed crops perform best when seeded at higher plant densities. Over the three growing seasons, oil content ranged from 42-53% and vernolic acid content ranged from 55-60%. Seed germination remains a significant problem, but the agronomic performance warrants further study.

Technical Abstract: Euphorbia lagascae Spreng., naturally produces vernolic acid, which could replace the synthetic vernolic acid currently used as a plasticizer. Field trials conducted at Simcoe, Ontario from 2014 to 2016 show three breeding lines of E. lagascae performed well under field conditions when grown from transplants. Low field germination rates made agronomic studies using direct seeded plants difficult. Treatment with gibberellic acid and/or fungicide, or priming with water prior to seeding did not significantly improve germination. In general, seed yield, oil content, and vernolic acid levels were not affected by nitrogen, or the application of chemical dehiscent. Higher stand densities did significantly increase seed yield and hence overall oil yield per hectare. Over the three growing seasons, oil and vernolic acid content ranged from 42%-53% and 56-61%, respectively. Additional research to improve field germination of seed would greatly facilitate the continued development of E. lagascae as a commercial crop for the production of vernolic acid.