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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Madison, Wisconsin » Vegetable Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #339457

Research Project: Resources for the Genetic Improvement of Potato

Location: Vegetable Crops Research

Title: Development and evaluation of four molecular markers tightly linked to the Potato virus Y resistance gene Rychc in diploid potato populations

Author
item FULLADOLSA, ANA - University Of Wisconsin
item Jansky, Shelley
item SMITH, D - University Of Wisconsin
item CHARKOWSKI, AMY - Colorado State University

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/24/2017
Publication Date: 8/5/2017
Citation: Fulladolsa, A.C., Jansky, S.H., Smith, D.R., Abramczak, C.M., Charkowski, A.O. 2017. Development and evaluation of four molecular markers tightly linked to the Potato virus Y resistance gene Rychc in diploid potato populations. American Phytopathological Society. Paper No. 258-P.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: In the last 15 years, Potato virus Y (PVY) has been the main pathogen causing seed potato lot rejections in North America. The most efficient and environmentally sound method of limiting incidence and spread of PVY is the use virus resistant potato cultivars. Several genes for extreme resistance to PVY have been found in wild potato relatives. We identified a PVY resistant, diploid clone of Solanum chacoense (CHC 39-7) carrying the resistance gene Rychc, previously mapped to the distal end of potato chromosome IX. CHC 39-7 was crossed with the susceptible, diploid clone of S. tuberosum, US-W4, and a resistant F1 progeny, XD3, was selfed to produce a segregating population. The genome of CHC 39-7 was sequenced and used to develop two TaqMan' SNP markers and two SCAR markers linked to Rychc. Phenotypic and genotypic data obtained from the XD3 selfed population did not show Mendelian segregation for resistance but suggested that there is a lethal factor associated with susceptibility. All four markers were tightly linked to Rychc and were efficient for selecting resistant individuals, with less than 5.2% recombination. The resistant germplasm, as well as the molecular tools generated and evaluated through this work, will better equip breeders to introduce a new source of PVY resistance into North American potatoes and develop virus resistant potato cultivars.