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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Environmental Microbial & Food Safety Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338845

Research Project: Sensing Technologies for the Detection and Characterization of Microbial, Chemical, and Biological Contaminants in Foods

Location: Environmental Microbial & Food Safety Laboratory

Title: Raman imaging from microscopy to macroscopy: Quality and safety control of biological materials

Author
item Lohumi, Santosh - Chungnam National University
item Kim, Moon
item Qin, Jianwei - Tony
item Cho, Byoung-kwan - Chungnam National University

Submitted to: Trends in Analytical Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/3/2017
Publication Date: 6/2/2017
Citation: Lohumi, S., Kim, M.S., Qin, J., Cho, B. 2017. Raman imaging from microscopy to macroscopy: Quality and safety control of biological materials. Trends in Analytical Chemistry. 93:183-198.

Interpretive Summary: Raman imaging generates detailed chemical signature images of biological materials that can be of great use in a wide range of applications, such as powder analysis in food and agricultural products. This review article introduces Raman spectroscopy and imaging and discusses computational methods for image data analysis, with an overview of food, pharmaceutical, and biomedical applications. This information will be useful to food, agricultural, and medical researchers seeking to develop new applications of the latest Raman imaging techniques.

Technical Abstract: Raman imaging can analyze biological materials by generating detailed chemical images. Over the last decade, tremendous advancements in Raman imaging and data analysis techniques have overcome problems such as long data acquisition and analysis times and poor sensitivity. This review article introduces Raman spectroscopy and imaging and discusses computational methods for image data analysis. We give an overview of the method’s applications in areas such as food, pharmaceutical, and biomedical sectors, with emphasis on recent developments that helped industrialize its applications in various sectors. Finally, limitations and trends for future Raman imaging are outlined and discussed with a view toward new research practices for applying this technique more efficiently and for use in new applications.