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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Madison, Wisconsin » Vegetable Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335731

Research Project: Cranberry Genetic Improvement and Insect Pest Management

Location: Vegetable Crops Research

Title: Investigating a novel pathway by which pheromone-based mating disruption may protect crops

Author
item Eisner, Natalie - University Of Wisconsin
item Chasen, Elissa
item Steffan, Shawn

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/3/2016
Publication Date: 11/4/2016
Citation: Eisner, N., Chasen, E.M., Steffan, S.A. 2016. Investigating a novel pathway by which pheromone-based mating disruption may protect crops [abstract]. Plant Science Symposium.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Pheromone-based mating disruption has been a successful, relatively new technology that growers use to reduce key insect populations. Mating disruption systems function by sending out false plumes of the insect sex pheromones – this interferes with the insect’s ability to find a mate, preempting egg fertilization and reducing crop damage. There are multiple mechanisms by which mating disruption is known to work, but recent findings have suggested there may be a novel mechanism: the ability of the host plant to detect the presence of herbivore’s courtship signals and respond by priming their defense compounds. From an evolutionary perspective, the plant’s capacity to react to these threats is likely the result of significant, predictable threats. The cranberry is a native plant, attacked by native herbivores. Consequently, cranberry plants may be detecting their herbivores’ sex pheromones and priming their defenses in advance of attack.