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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Albany, California » Western Regional Research Center » Healthy Processed Foods Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323574

Research Project: New Sustainable Processing Technologies to Produce Healthy, Value-Added Foods from Specialty Crops

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Extrusion of rice, bean, and corn starches: extrudate structure and molecular changes in amylose and amylopectin

Author
item Vanier-levine, Nathan - Universidade Federal De Pelotas
item Vanadevam, Varatharajan - Cargill, Incorporated
item Bruni, Graziella - Universidade Federal De Pelotas
item Ferreira, Cristiano - Federal University Of Pelotas
item Pinto, Vania - Universidade Federal De Pelotas
item Da Rosa Zavareze, Elessandra - Universidade Federal De Pelotas
item Elias, Moacir - Universidade Federal De Pelotas
item Berrios, Jose

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/27/2016
Publication Date: 10/28/2016
Citation: Vanier-Levine, N., Vanadevam, V., Bruni, G.P., Ferreira, C.D., Pinto, V.Z., Da Rosa Zavareze, E., Elias, M.C., Berrios, J.D. 2016. Extrusion of starches from different sources and amylose contents: effect on extrudate structure and molecular changes in amylose and amylopectin. Journal of Food Science. 81(12):E2932-E2938.

Interpretive Summary: This study evaluated the effects of starch source and amylose content on the expansion, density and texture of expanded extrudates, as well as the structural and molecular changes that occurred in starch granules as a function of extrusion. Rice starches (8%, 20% and 32% amylose), carioca bean starch (35% amylose), and Hylon V corn starch (55% amylose) were used. Structural and molecular changes in starch granules were evaluated by microscopy, chromatography, and X-ray techniques. The extrudates from rice starches containing 20% and 32% amylose presented the highest expansion. While, extrudates from Hylon V corn starch containing 55% amylose presented the lowest expansion. Additionally, the extrudates with 55% amylose exhibited values of hardness two times greater than extrudates with 20%, 32% and 35% amylose. Amylopectin starch promoted the elasticity of the cooked starch matrix, but it did not strengthen the wall of the extrudate bubbles during expansion.

Technical Abstract: This study evaluated the effects of starch source and amylose content on expansion ratio, density and texture of expanded extrudates, as well as the structural and molecular changes that occurred in starch granules as a function of extrusion. Rice starches (8%, 20% and 32% amylose), carioca bean starch (35% amylose), and Hylon V corn starch (55% amylose) were used. Structural and molecular changes in starch granules were evaluated by light microscopy, gel permeation chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extrudates from rice starches containing 20% and 32% amylose presented the highest expansion ratio. While, extrudates from Hylon V corn starch containing 55% amylose presented the lowest expansion ratio. Additionally, the extrudates with 55% amylose exhibited values of hardness two times greater than extrudates with 20%, 32% and 35% amylose. Amylopectin promoted the elasticity of the gelatinized starch matrix, but it did not strengthen the wall of the extrudate bubbles during expansion.