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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Biology, Control, and Area-Wide Management of Fruit Flies and Other Quarantine Pests

Location: Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research

Title: Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a new attractant for the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt))

Author
item Siderhurst, Matthew
item Park, Soo
item Suttles, Caitlyn
item Jamie, Ian
item Manoukis, Nicholas
item Jang, Eric
item Taylor, Phillip

Submitted to: Journal of Chemical Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/31/2016
Publication Date: 3/20/2016
Citation: Siderhurst, M.S., Park, S.J., Suttles, C.N., Jamie, I.M., Manoukis, N., Jang, E.B., Taylor, P.W. 2016. Raspberry Ketone Trifluoroacetate, a new attractant for the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt)). Journal of Chemical Ecology. 42:156-162.

Interpretive Summary: In this paper the behavioral response of Bactrocera tryoni, a pest of agricultural concern, to a new lure is investigated using cameras and electrophysiological techniques. The new lure is a novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroacetate (RKTA). We find a very strong behavioral response to this lure, stronger than lures currently in use, which indicates that it may be promising for programs aimed at detecting and suppressing this pest.

Technical Abstract: The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni, Q-fly) is a major agricultural pest in eastern Australia. The deployment of male lures comprises an important component of several control and detection strategies for this pest. A novel fluorinated analog of raspberry ketone, raspberry ketone trifluoroacetate (RKTA), has been developed with the aim of further improving Q-fly control. Quantification of Q-fly responses in a choice-test cage bioassay showed RKTA attracted and arrested more flies, 133 ± 4, than did cuelure, -99 ± 4. Similarly, RKTA also attracted and arrested more flies, 91 ± 3, than did melolure, -29 ± 3. RKTA also elicited strong electroantennogram (EAG) responses from Q-flies, while cuelure and melolure responses were not significantly greater than a negative control. However, the Q-fly EAG responses to RKTA are likely due at least in part to trifluoroacetic acid, which is a hydrolysis product of RKTA and elicits strong EAG responses when tested alone.

Last Modified: 09/22/2017
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