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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » ABADRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315120

Research Project: Ecology and Control of Insect Vectors

Location: Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Insecticidal sugar trap for biting midges

Author
item Cohnstaedt, Lee
item SNYDER, DARREN - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Veterinaria Italiana
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/7/2015
Publication Date: 9/30/2016
Citation: Cohnstaedt, L.W., Snyder, D. 2016. Insecticidal sugar trap for biting midges. Veterinaria Italiana. https://doi.org/10.12834/VetIt.572.2734.2.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12834/VetIt.572.2734.2

Interpretive Summary: Toxic sugar baits for mosquitoes and house flies have proven efficacy to reduce insect populations and consequently, disease transmission rates to animals and humans. The new insecticidal sugar trap (IST) is designed specifically for controlling biting midges near livestock and larval breeding habitats. The trap operates by combining light-emitting diode (LED) technology with insecticidal sugar baits. The positive photoattraction of the Culicoides elicited by the LEDs, draws the insects to the insecticidal sugar bait, which can be made from various commercial insecticide formulations (pyrethroids, neonicotinids, etc.) or naturally derived formulations (boric acid, garlic oil, etc.) that are lethal to Culicoides. Insecticidal sugar trap advantages such as the lights can be customized to the insect, various insecticides can be used, screens can be used to keep out larger insects (for example bees and butterflies), the trap kills male and female adults, and it is low maintenance. The key components of the trap are described.

Technical Abstract: Toxic sugar baits for mosquitoes and house flies have proven efficacy to reduce insect populations and consequently, disease transmission rates. The new insecticidal sugar trap (IST) is designed specifically for controlling biting midge disease vector populations around livestock and near larval breeding habitats. The trap operates by combining light-emitting diode (LED) technology with insecticidal sugar baits. The positive photoattraction of the Culicoides elicited by the LEDs, draws the insects to the insecticidal sugar bait, which can be made from various commercial insecticide formulations (pyrethroids, neonicotinids, etc.) or naturally derived formulations (boric acid, garlic oil, etc.) that are lethal to Culicoides. Insecticidal sugar trap advantages include: (1) LED lights that can be customized, (2) various oral insecticides may be used with different modes of action to help combat the evolution of pesticide resistance, (3) screening on the trap reduces non-target insect feeding (for example bees and butterflies), (4) targets males and females of the species because both must feed on sugar, and (5) low energy LEDs and a solar panel reduce trap maintenance to refilling sugar baits, rather than replacing batteries. Identified here are key components of an IST to increase its effectiveness for biting midge control.