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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania » Eastern Regional Research Center » Biobased and Other Animal Co-products Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313390

Research Project: PRODUCTION AND VALUE ENHANCEMENT OF BIOSURFACTANTS AND BIOPOLYMERS DERIVED FROM AGRICULTURAL LIPIDS AND COPRODUCTS

Location: Biobased and Other Animal Co-products Research

Title: Biosynthesis and skin health applications of antimicrobial glycolipids

Author
item Solaiman, Daniel - Dan
item Ashby, Richard - Rick

Submitted to: Annual Meeting and Expo of the American Oil Chemists' Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/16/2015
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Citation: Solaiman, D., Ashby, R.D. 2015. Biosynthesis and skin health applications of antimicrobial glycolipids [abstract]. Annual Meeting and Expo of the American Oil Chemists' Society. p. 6.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Microbial-produced glycolipids (MGLs) such as sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs), and mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are amphiphilic molecules, and thus have been widely explored for use as surfactants/detergents, emulsifiers, and lubricants. One major hindrance to their widespread commercial adoption is the higher prices in comparison to their non-renewable petroleum-based counterparts. To overcome this, research abounds in developing production systems that will lead to lower production costs. On top of that, many studies have been and continue to be conducted to find and explore any value-added properties possessed by these molecules which could help justify the higher costs of MGLs. This paper will first survey the current advances in production trends and skin health applications (e.g., antimicrobial, wound-healing promotion, fibroblast rejuvenation, emollient, etc.) of MGLs. We will then present our lab’s research on using surplus agricultural byproducts as inexpensive feedstocks in the fermentative production of MGLs, and provide evidence for SLs as antibacterial agents particularly by demonstrating anti-acne activity against the causative bacterium (Propionibacterium acnes) when immobilized on biopolymer films.