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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Hilo, Hawaii » Daniel K. Inouye U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center » Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #303658

Research Project: Pre and Postharvest Treatment of Tropical and Other Commodities for Quarantine Security, Quality Maintenance, and Value Enhancement

Location: Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research

Title: Basil oil fumigation increases radiation sensitivity in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

Author
item Houssain, F. - Institut National De La Recherche Scientifique (INRS)
item Follett, Peter
item Salmieri, S. - Institut National De La Recherche Scientifique (INRS)
item Lacroix, M. - Institut National De La Recherche Scientifique (INRS)

Submitted to: Journal of Stored Products Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/5/2014
Publication Date: 6/26/2014
Citation: Houssain, F., Follett, P.A., Salmieri, S., Lacroix, M. 2014. Basil oil fumigant toxicity to a stored grain pest Sitophilus oryzae in combination with irradiation. Journal of Stored Products Research. 59:108-112.

Interpretive Summary: The biological activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) oil was tested against the stored product pest rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae(L.). The effect of basil oil and irradiation on mortality was synergistic when used in combination against S.oryzae in packaged rice. The type of rice package affected treatment efficacy. In paper rice packages,78% mortality was observed with 2.5µl/ml basil oil and a radiation dose of 200 Gy at 5 d post treatment. In plastic packages,100% mortality was achieved with 0.83 µl/ml basil oil and a radiation dose of 200 Gy at 5 d post treatment. Basil oil has significant potential as a synergist to lower the radiation dose required to control quarantine pests.

Technical Abstract: The biological activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) oil was tested against the stored product pest rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae(L.). Adult weevils were exposed to seven different concentrations of basil oil ranging from 0.12 µl/ml-0.60 µl/ml in Petri dishes and mortality was assessed at 3,4 and 5 d post treatment. Mortality increased with increasing exposure time and basil oil concentration. At 3,4 and 5 d post treatment, the LC50 values were 8.14,6.50 and 4.91 µl/ml of basil oil respectively. S. oryzae was also exposed to 0.12 or 0.24 µl/ml basil oil and irradiated at 20,40,60,80,100 or 120 Gy in Petri dishes before mortality assessment at 5 d post treatment. The effectiveness of irradiation treatment against S.oryzae was enhanced by exposure to basil oil. S.oryzae exposed to 0.12 and 0.24 µl/ml of basil oil were 4.1 and 5.3 times more sensitive to irradiation respectively compared to control weevils treated only with irradiation. The effect of basil oil and irradiation on mortality was synergistic when used in combination against S.oryzae in packaged rice. The type of rice package affected treatment efficacy. In paper rice packages,78% mortality was observed with 2.5µl/ml basil oil and a radiation dose of 200 Gy at 5 d post treatment. In plastic packages,100% mortality was achieved with 0.83 µl/ml basil oil and a radiation dose of 200 Gy at 5 d post treatment. Basil oil has significant potential as a synergist to lower the radiation dose required to control quarantine pests.