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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #293617

Research Project: ENHANCING GENETIC MERIT OF RUMINANTS THROUGH GENOME SELECTION AND ANALYSIS

Location: Animal Genomics and Improvement Laboratory

Title: The 1000 bull genome project

Author
item Daetwyler, Hans - Department Of Primary Industries
item Capitan, Aurelien - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Pausch, Hubert - Technische Universitat Munchen
item Stothard, Paul - University Of Alberta
item Van Binsbergen, Rianne - Wageningen Agricultural University
item Brandum, Rasmus - Aarhus University
item Liao, Xiaoping - University Of Alberta
item Djari, Anis - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Rodriguez, Sabrina - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Grohs, Cecile - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Jung, Simone - Technical University Of Munich
item Esquerre, Diane - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Gollnick, Nicole - University Of Munchen
item Rossignol, Marie-noelle - Laboratoire D'Analyses Genetiques Pour Les Especes Animales(LABOGENA)
item Klopp, Christophe - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Rocha, Dominique - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Fritz, Sebastien - The National Union Of The Cooperatives Of Elevage And Of Animal Insemination (UNCEIA)
item Eggen, Andre - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Bowman, Phil - Department Of Primary Industries
item Coote, David - Department Of Primary Industries
item Chamberlin, Amanda - Department Of Primary Industries
item Van Tassell, Curtis - Curt
item Huggsle, Ina - Wageningen Agricultural University
item Goddard, Mike - Department Of Primary Industries
item Guldbrandsten, Bernt - Aarhus University
item Lund, Mogens - Aarhus University
item Veerkamp, Roel - Wageningen Agricultural University
item Boichard, Didier - Institut National De La Recherche Agronomique (INRA)
item Fries, Ruedi - Technische Universitat Munchen
item Hayes, Ben - Department Of Primary Industries

Submitted to: Nature Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/20/2014
Publication Date: 7/13/2014
Citation: Daetwyler, H.D., Capitan, A., Pausch, H., Stothard, P., Van Binsbergen, R., Brandum, R.F., Liao, X., Djari, A., Rodriguez, S., Grohs, C., Jung, S., Esquerre, D., Gollnick, N., Rossignol, M., Klopp, C., Rocha, D., Fritz, S., Eggen, A., Bowman, P., Coote, D., Chamberlin, A., Van Tassell, C.P., Huggsle, I., Goddard, M., Guldbrandsten, B., Lund, M.S., Veerkamp, R., Boichard, D., Fries, R., Hayes, B.J. 2014. The 1000 bull genome project. Nature Genetics. 46(8):858-865.

Interpretive Summary: To meet growing global demands for high value protein from milk and meat, rates of genetic gain in domestic cattle must be accelerated. At the same time, animal health and welfare must be considered. The 1000 bull genomes project supports these goals by providing a catalog of genetic variation and the genetic status of key ancestor bulls of modern cattle breeds. A total of 28.3 million locations of genetic differences were identified from 234 full-genome cattle sequences of Bos taurus cattle. The power of the data set is demonstrated by discovery of new mutations potentially causing early embryonic loss, a severe skin disease, and another lethal disease known as bulldog calf syndrome. Genetic studies of milk production traits, using imputed results inferred from these data, identified new potential genetic variations associated with these traits. This information is useful for animal geneticists to rapidly identify genetic mutations that compromise animal health, welfare, and productivity, which benefits the cattle industry.

Technical Abstract: To meet growing global demands for high value protein from milk and meat, rates of genetic gain in domestic cattle must be accelerated. At the same time, animal health and welfare must be considered. The 1000 bull genomes project supports these goals by providing annotated sequence variants and genotypes of key ancestor bulls. A total of 28.3 million variants were detected in 234 full- genome cattle sequences of Bos taurus cattle. The power of the data set is demonstrated by discovery of novel mutations potentially causing embryonic death, severe skin disease, and lethal chondrodysplasia. Genome wide association studies for milk production traits, using imputed sequence variants, identified new putative causal mutations.