Skip to main content
ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Crop Bioprotection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #168953

Title: OPTIMIZATION AND USE OF THE CARPOPHILUS SAYI (COLEOPTERA: NITIDULIDAE) PHEROMONE IN OAK WILT MANAGEMENT

Author
item AMBOURN, ANGIE
item JUZWIK, JINNIFER
item Bartelt, Robert
item SEYBOLD, STEVEN

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/29/2003
Publication Date: 10/29/2003
Citation: Ambourn, A.K., Juzwik, J., Bartelt, R.J., Seybold, S.J. 2003. Optimization and use of the Carpophilus sayi (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) pheromone in oak wilt management [abstract]. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting. Abstract No. 0422.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Ceratocystis fagacearum, (Bretz) Hunt, the causal agent of oak wilt, is transmitted overland from diseased to healthy oaks by sap beetles (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae). Carpophilus sayi (Parsons) has been implicated as one of the principal sap beetle vectors in Minnesota. Field studies were conducted with synthetically produced, male aggregation pheromone to determine 1) optimal rate and effect of a food synergist on beetle response, and 2) seasonal flight activity. Wind-oriented funnel traps with six different bait treatments were re-randomized weekly from April 4 through October 18, 2002, in four east-central Minnesota sites. The high dose (500 µg) pheromone plus whole wheat bread dough attracted the highest numbers of C. sayi. Carpophilus brachypterus Say and C. corticinus Erich were also found in the traps indicating cross-attraction. Peaks in C. sayi flight activity occurred in mid-July and early October; a second year of monitoring is currently underway. This optimized bait involving a commercially available pheromone will be useful in refining high risk periods for oak wilt spread. In addition to identifying peak periods of flight activity, the beetles trapped with this bait may also be assayed to determine fungal phoresy rates.