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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Molecular Characterization of the Major Wheat Domestication Gene Q)

Author
item Simons, Kristin
item Fellers, John
item Trick, Harold
item Zhang, Zengcui
item Tai, Yin Shan
item Gill, Bikram
item Faris, Justin

Submitted to: Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/12/2005
Publication Date: 1/20/2006
Citation: Simons, K.J., Fellers, J.P., Trick, H.N., Zhang, Z., Tai, Y., Gill, B.S., Faris, J.D. 2006. Molecular Characterization of the Major Wheat Domestication Gene Q. Genetics. 172:547-555.

Interpretive Summary: The conversion of wild grasses with natural seed dispersal mechanisms into non-shattering free-threshing domesticated forms launched agriculture revolution. The domestication of wheat is historically recent and a principle factor in the rise of modern human civilization. The wheat Q gene governs the free-threshing character, and it also pleiotropically influences a repertoire of other domestication-related traits. Here, we show Q is a major regulatory gene involved in floral development. Analysis of knockout mutants and transgenic plants expressing varying copy numbers indicated that Q gene action is dosage dependent, and influences threshability, rachis fragility (shattering), glume tenacity, glume shape, spike length and plant height. Sequence comparisons between domesticated wheats and other grasses suggest that Q arose from q through mutation.

Technical Abstract: The domestication of wheat is historically recent and a principle factor in the rise of modern human civilization. The wheat Q gene governs numerous domestication-related traits, most importantly the free-threshing character. Here, we show Q is a floral homeotic gene with similarity to the AP2 class of transcription factors. Analysis of knockout mutants and transgenic plants expressing varying copy numbers indicated that Q gene action is dosage dependent, and influences threshability, rachis fragility, glume tenacity, glume shape, spike length and plant height. Sequence comparisons between domesticated wheats and other grasses suggest that Q arose from q through mutation.

Last Modified: 05/24/2017
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