Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

headline bar

Plain Facts Banner

Issue: January/December 2010


The Northern PlainFacts electronic newsletter offers brief updates on research, personnel, and events from both the Agricultural Systems Research Unit and Pest Management Research Unit at NPARL, and includes contact names and information for those interested in further details. 
 

In This Year's Issue:

ARS Research Ecologist speaker at National Native Seed Conference

ARS scientist gives presentations at Universities in the Dakotas

ARS researcher participates in Range Research Pipeline

Montana ARS lab hosts SKYWARN training for the community

ARS researchers co-edit, contribute to new Cercospora book by APS Press

ARS ecologist speaks at Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Annual Meeting

 

 

 

 

ARS Research Ecologist speaker at National Native Seed Conference

ARS Research Ecologist spoke at National Native Seed Conference in Snowbird, UT on May 18, 2010. The session title was “Genetic considerations in native plant materials development and use” and focused on answering the question, “What role does genetics play in restoration success?” Dr. Espeland’s presentation titled, “Manipulating plasticity to increase native seed success” centers on how maternal plants produce offspring tolerant to environmental conditions with further study may lead to maximizing native seed performance by manipulating the production environment. Dr. Espeland was one of many session speakers to help explain how genetic considerations can be incorporated at all stages of the native plant materials development process, from seed collection to research, production, storage and ultimately use to restore native plant habitat. Insight centered on prioritizing genetic considerations and real-world examples of how genetics has been successfully incorporated in restoration projects.

 

(Erin Espeland, 406.433-9416, erin.espeland@ars.usda.gov)

 

 

ARS scientist gives presentations at Universities in the Dakotas

ARS Research Ecologist Dr. Erin Espeland was invited to give seminar presentations at state universities in the Dakota states. The presentation titled, "Natural-enemy prey interactions in changing landscapes: implications for conservation and agriculture" was given in Fargo, ND on Friday, April 16, and again on April 19 in Brookings, SD. Invitations were extended by the Department of Entomology, North Dakota State University, and also by the Plant Science Department of South Dakota State University with cooperation with ARS’s North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory, Brookings, SD.

 

(Erin Espeland, 406.433-9416, erin.espeland@ars.usda.gov)

 

 

ARS researcher participates in Range Research Pipeline

NPARL Researcher Dr. John Gaskin attended the “Range Research Pipeline at the USDA-ARS Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory, Mandan, ND on April 13-14 to share current range research being done at NPARL. Dr. John Hendrickson, ARS rangeland scientist, of Mandan, ND, chaired the event. The goal of the conference was to share range and forage research being conducted in the northern Great Plains, gather information regarding pressing range and forage research needs, and develop research collaborations between researchers and between researchers and land management agencies, conservation groups and/or producers. Other agencies represented at the meeting were North Dakota State University (Main Station and Research Station), Fargo, ND; ARS (Mandan, ND, and Miles City and Sidney, MT); South Dakota State University-Brookings; USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, Jamestown, ND and Ag Canada, Swift Current.

 

(John Gaskin, 406.433.9444, john.gaskin@ars.usda.gov)

 

 

Montana ARS lab hosts SKYWARN training for the community

Nine people participated in two different Severe Weather Spotter Training Sessions (SKYWARN) hosted by the Sidney, MT, ARS facility on April 12. The session was sponsored by the National Weather Service, in conjunction with the Richland County Department of Disaster. Jackie Couture, Safety Specialist, works closely with NOAA from Glasgow, MT, to coordinate weather and safety training for both its employees and the community at large. Participants in the session were provided information about how storms work and what to do in the event of severe weather. Certified participants and others will serve as spotters for the National Weather Service, which along with emergency management officials, greatly relies on the reports they get from the public during severe weather events to help with decision making. Under the direction of NPARL Safety Specialist Jackie Couture, the Sidney lab has hosted several storm training sessions for more than 7 years to educate the public and its employees about proper measures to take during severe weather.

 

(Jackie Couture, 406-433-9422, jackie.couture@ars.usda.gov)

 

 

ARS researchers co-edit, contribute to new Cercospora book by APS Press

NPARL Research Plant Pathologist Robert T. Lartey helped instigate, write and co-edit a new comprehensive volume entitled Cercospora Leaf Spot of Sugar Beet and Related Species recently released by APS PRESS, St. Paul, MN. Helping co-edit the book were fellow ARS sugar beet researchers Lee Panella (Ft. Collins, CO) and John J. Weiland (Fargo, ND), along with Drs. Carol E. Windels (University of MN, Crookston) and Pedro W. Crous (CBS-KNAW, Utrecht, The Netherlands ), all of whom also contributed chapters to the book. In addition, more than 15 other Cercospora experts from around the world also contributed chapters. Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) of sugar beet is the most important foliar disease of sugar beet and occurs wherever the crop is grown. The disease has been documented for over a century and can result in significant yield reduction and sugar loss. Research on CLS has been ongoing over the same time period, but until now much of what was learned was scattered far and wide, requiring extensive searches to locate information on the disease. For the first time that information is now collected within a single publication that offers a historical overview and covers the biology (taxonomy, ecology, epidemiology and toxins) and comprehensive (traditional and novel) management of the disease. The book is intended as a comprehensive resource for researchers, the industry, and sugar beet growers. It is available from APS Press at: http://www.shopapspress.org/celespofsube.html .

 

(Robert Lartey, 406.433-9490, robert.lartey@ars.usda.gov

 

 

ARS ecologist speaks at Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Annual Meeting

ARS Research Ecologist Robert Srygley spoke at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) annual meeting held in Seattle, WA, January 3-7. Co-sponsoring societies for the meeting included the American Microscopical Society, Animal Behavior Society, The Crustacean Society. Dr. Srygley was invited to chair a Wednesday afternoon session on “Integrative Migration Biology” as well as giving an oral presentation entitled, “Nutritional effects on migration and immunity: Mormon crickets in Nevada contrast sharply with a band in Utah.” Currently little is known about the role of nutrition in insect immunity. Dr. Srygley’s research focuses on the impacts of nutrient limitations on the immune defenses of Mormon cricket bands and whether insects may require a balanced diet to maximize defense against invasion. Srygley is a member of NPARL’s Pest Management Research Unit.

 

(Robert Srygley, 406.433.9420, robert.srygley@ars.usda.gov)
 

 

 

Back to the Top



 

Last Modified: 10/31/2011
Footer Content Back to Top of Page