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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Components and Health Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #407273

Research Project: Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Food Components and their Impact on Chronic Disease Risk

Location: Food Components and Health Laboratory

Title: Sex-specific metabolic adaptations from in utero exposure to particulate matter derived from combustion of petrodiesel and biodiesel fuels

Author
item JETTON, THOMAS - University Of Vermont
item GALBRAITH, OBAN - University Of Vermont
item PESHAVARIA, MINA - University Of Vermont
item BONNEY, ELIZABETH - University Of Vermont
item HOLMEN, BRITT - University Of Vermont
item Fukagawa, Naomi

Submitted to: Chemosphere
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/17/2023
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Maternal exposure to exhaust from combustion of diesel fuel has been reported to impact her offspring by increasing their risk for obesity, diabetes, and neurological problems. The use of biodiesel fuels has been increasing worldwide but studies on the health impact of biodiesel compared to petrodiesel have been controversial because of differences in the chemical and physical nature of the associated particulate matter (PM). To explore the long-term impact of prenatal exposure, pregnant mice were exposed to PM generated by combustion of petrodiesel (B0) and a 20% soy BD blend (B20) through aspiration during embryonic days 9-17 and allowed to deliver. Offspring were then followed for 52 weeks. We found that mother's exposure to B0 and B20 PM manifested in striking sex-specific phenotypes with respect to metabolic adaptation, maintenance of glucose homeostasis, and medial hypothalamic glial cell makeup in the offspring. The data suggest PM exposure limited to a narrower critical developmental window may be compensated for by the mother and/or the fetus by altered metabolic programming in a marked sex-specific and fuel-derived PM-specific manner, leading to sex-specific risk for diseases related to environmental exposure later in life. This may impact future development of fuels and engines that could mitigate adverse health consequences.

Technical Abstract: Maternal exposure to particulate matter derived from diesel exhaust has been shown to cause metabolic dysregulation, neurological problems, and increased susceptibility to diabetes in the offspring. Diesel exhaust is a major source of air pollution and the use of biodiesel (BD) and its blends have been progressively increasing throughout the world; however, studies on the health impact of BD vs. petrodiesel combustion-generated exhaust have been controversial in part, due to differences in the chemical and physical nature of the associated particulate matter (PM). To explore the long-term impact of prenatal exposure, pregnant mice were exposed to PM generated by combustion of petrodiesel (B0) and a 20% soy BD blend (B20) by intratracheal instillation during embryonic days 9-17 and allowed to deliver. Offspring were then followed for 52 weeks. We found that mother's exposure to B0 and B20 PM manifested in striking sex-specific phenotypes with respect to metabolic adaptation, maintenance of glucose homeostasis, and medial hypothalamic glial cell makeup in the offspring. The data suggest PM exposure limited to a narrower critical developmental window may be compensated for by the mother and/or the fetus by altered metabolic programming in a marked sex-specific and fuel-derived PM-specific manner, leading to sex-specific risk for diseases related to environmental exposure later in life.