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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #396280

Research Project: Impact of Maternal Influence and Early Dietary Factors on Child Growth, Development, and Metabolic Health

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Resistance Training as a Countermeasure in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Current Literature and Future Directions

Author
item ALLMAN, BRITTANY - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item MCDONALD, SAMANTHA - Illinois State University
item MAY, LINDA - East Carolina University
item BORSHEIM, ELISABET - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)

Submitted to: Journal of Sports Medicine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/11/2022
Publication Date: 7/9/2022
Citation: Allman, B.R., McDonald, S., May, L., Borsheim, E. 2022. Resistance Training as a Countermeasure in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Review of Current Literature and Future Directions. Journal of Sports Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-022-01724-w.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-022-01724-w

Interpretive Summary: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a great health concern for both pregnant women and their baby. Exercise is known to be a cornerstone of glucose control in GDM. However, most research regarding this topic examines aerobic training (AT), even though there is significant evidence of the benefit of resistance training (RT) in improving glucose regulation problems in other groups of diabetics, such as in type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to review research that examined the impact of RT on markers of glucose control in GDM, and to discuss future research directions to determine the benefits of RT in GDM. Based on the current evidence, RT is effective in reducing insulin requirement, especially in overweight women, reducing fasting glucose concentrations, and improving short-term glucose control after a meal. However, the number of studies and findings limit conclusions about the impact of RT on risk of GDM, fasting insulin concentrations, insulin resistance, beta cell function, and exercise glucose control. Overall, current evidence is building to suggest that RT is a promising tool to control circulating glucose in women with GDM, and a potential alternative or supplement to AT.

Technical Abstract: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) poses a significant health concern for both mother and offspring. Exercise has emerged as a cornerstone of glycemic management in GDM. However, most research regarding this topic examines aerobic training (AT), despite substantial evidence for the effectiveness of resistance training (RT) in improving dysregulated glucose in other groups of people with diabetes, such as in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thus, the purpose of this paper is to review research that examined the impact of RT on markers of glucose management in GDM, and to discuss future research directions to determine the benefits of RT in GDM. Based on the current evidence, RT is effective in reducing insulin requirement, especially in overweight women, reducing fasting glucose concentrations, and improving short-term postprandial glycemic control. However, the number of studies and findings limit conclusions about the impact of RT on risk of GDM, fasting insulin concentrations, insulin resistance, ß-cell function, and intra-exercise glucose management. Overall, current evidence is accumulating to suggest that RT is a promising non-pharmacological tool to regulate circulating glucose concentrations in women with GDM, and a potential alternative or supplement to AT.