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Research Project: Elucidating the Factors that Determine the Ecology of Human Pathogens in Foods

Location: Produce Safety and Microbiology Research

Title: Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood: recent progress in understanding influential factors at harvest and food-safety intervention approaches

Author
item NDRAHA, NODALI - National Taiwan Ocean University
item Huang, Lihan
item Wu, Vivian
item HSIAO, HSIN-I - National Taiwan Ocean University

Submitted to: Current Opinion in Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/6/2022
Publication Date: 10/7/2022
Citation: Ndraha, N., Huang, L., Wu, V.C., Hsiao, H. 2022. Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood: recent progress in understanding influential factors at harvest and food-safety intervention approaches. Current Opinion in Food Science. 48:100927. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cofs.2022.100927.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cofs.2022.100927

Interpretive Summary: Seafood is a nutrient-rich food, providing a source of healthy fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals. However, Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a major foodborne pathogen often contaminates seafood, food-processing facilities, and manufacturing environments, potentially causing human vibriosis. This review provided insights into current seafood safety control applications, leading toward needs for future research.

Technical Abstract: Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a foodborne pathogen that is naturally found in estuarine and marine environments. Seafood may acquire this pathogen from its culturing environment or through cross-contamination events. Recent scientific studies have shown that the occurrence and levels of this pathogen in seafood at harvest are influenced by aquaculture practices and environmental factors. Sea surface temperature and salinity conditions largely influence this pathogen at harvest. At post-harvest, studies have demonstrated possible strategies for controlling its growth and its biofilms in seafood and on contact surfaces. This review summarized the current knowledge on the risk of V. parahaemolyticus in seafood with particular attention to 1) factors influencing the occurrence and levels of this pathogen at harvest, and 2) post-harvest strategies for controlling V. parahaemolyticus growth in seafood and removing its biofilms from seafood and seafood-contact surfaces. Challenges and prospects in supporting the management of seafood safety related to this pathogen were also discussed.