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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #379783

Research Project: Impact of Maternal Influence and Early Dietary Factors on Child Growth, Development, and Metabolic Health

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Association between home environment in infancy and child movement behaviors

Author
item KRACHT, CHELSEA - Pennington Biomedical Research Center
item REDMAN, LEANNE - Pennington Biomedical Research Center
item CASEY, PATRICK - University Arkansas For Medical Sciences (UAMS)
item KRUKOWSKI, REBECCA - Tennessee University
item ANDRES, ALINE - University Arkansas For Medical Sciences (UAMS)

Submitted to: Childhood Obesity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/24/2020
Publication Date: 3/15/2021
Citation: Kracht, C.L., Redman, L.M., Casey, P.H., Krukowski, R.A., Andres, A. 2021. Association between home environment in infancy and child movement behaviors. Childhood Obesity. 17(2):100-109. https://doi.org/10.1089/chi.2020.0319.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1089/chi.2020.0319

Interpretive Summary: An adequate balance of movement, sleep, and screen-time, is important for preventing excess weight in children. This study examined the relationship between the home environment and movement, sleep, and screen-time at age 2 years. The home environment was assessed for developmental stimulation, organization, and number of toys by a questionnaire when the child was 6-months of age. At 2-years of age, screen-time, physical activity and sleep duration were estimated. Children who met the screen-time guideline lived in homes with more developmental stimulation and toys. Children who met guidelines for movement, sleep, and screen-time lived in homes with more organization and toys. In conclusion, the infant home environment was associated with appropriate amounts of movement at age 2-years. Promoting routines and toys in infancy may help facilitate non-screen-based habits and healthy development.

Technical Abstract: An adequate balance of movement behaviors, including physical activity (PA), sleep, and screen-time, is important for preventing excess weight gain in children. This study examined the relationship between the infant home environment and movement behaviors later in life. Pregnant women were recruited for an observational study related to maternal and child development. The home environment was assessed for developmental stimulation, organization, and toys by the Pediatric Review of Children's Environmental Support and Stimulation (PROCESS) questionnaire when the child was 6-months of age. At 2-years of age, mother's reported child screen-time, and child PA and sleep duration were estimated by accelerometry. Child behaviors were compared to the 24-hour Movement Guidelines (>=180 minutes/day of total PA, 11-14 hours/day of sleep, and <=1 hour/day of screen-time). Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between the home environment and movement behaviors, adjusting for maternal and child covariates. Mother-child dyads (n=141) were mainly white (84.4%), and middle (32.8%) or low income (48.9%). All children (100%) met the PA guideline, some met the sleep guideline (71.6%), fewer met the screen-time guideline (44.7%) and only one-third (34.0%) met all 3 guidelines. Children who met the screen-time guideline lived in homes with more developmental stimulation and toys (p<0.05). Children who met all 3 guidelines lived in homes with more organization and toys (p<0.05). The infant home environment was associated with appropriate amounts of movement behaviors at 2-years. Promoting organization (i.e. routines) and toys in infancy may help facilitate non-screen-based habits and healthy development.