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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378773

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: A Maximum Dose Bioassay to Assess Susceptibility of Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 to Key Insecticides

Author
item DE MARCHI, BRUNO - University Of Florida
item SMITH, HUGH - University Of Florida
item Turechek, William
item RILEY, DAVID - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/13/2021
Publication Date: 2/13/2021
Citation: De Marchi, B., Smith, H., Turechek, W., Riley, D. 2021. A Maximum Dose Bioassay to Assess Susceptibility of Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 to Key Insecticides. Journal of Economic Entomology. https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toab016.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toab016

Interpretive Summary: The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci MEAM1, is a major pest of several agricultural crops causing serious losses to Florida vegetable and ornamental production. Whiteflies have demonstrated the ability to develop tolerance to a broad range of insecticide. We carried out a maximum dose bioassay to assess the efficacy of key insecticides for field populations collected in South Florida. Overall, imidacloprid demonstrated the poorest efficacy, dinotefuran and flupyradifurone were the most effective, and bifenthrin, cyantraniliprole and thiamethoxam tended to group together providing intermediate control. The data will aid growers’ decisions regarding insecticide timing and choice, and increase efficacy of chemical control as one component in integrated pest management programs for whiteflies.

Technical Abstract: The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is a major pest of several agricultural crops causing serious losses to Florida vegetable and ornamental production. Whiteflies have demonstrated the ability to develop tolerance to a broad range of insecticide. Resistance monitoring typically involves serial dilution bioassays that require substantial resources. We carried out a maximum dose bioassay, which is simpler and enables the testing of more insecticides, to assess the efficacy of key insecticides for field populations collected in South Florida. Overall, imidacloprid demonstrated the poorest efficacy, dinotefuran and flupyradifurone were the most effective, and bifenthrin, cyantraniliprole and thiamethoxam tended to group together providing intermediate control. The data will aid growers’ decisions regarding insecticide timing and choice, and increase efficacy of chemical control as one component in integrated pest management programs for whiteflies.