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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #372490

Research Project: Impact of Maternal Influence and Early Dietary Factors on Child Growth, Development, and Metabolic Health

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Changes in polyphenolics during storage of products prepared with freeze-dried wild blueberry powder

Author
item LAVEFVE, LAURA - University Of Arkansas
item BROWNMILLER, CINDY - University Of Arkansas
item HOWARD, LUKE - University Of Arkansas
item REEVES, DONOVAN - University Of Arkansas
item Ferruzzi, Mario
item CHEN, JIN-RAN - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item DIAZ, EVA - Arkansas Children'S Nutrition Research Center (ACNC)
item MAUROMOUSTAKOS, ANDY - University Of Arkansas

Submitted to: Foods
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/6/2020
Publication Date: 4/9/2020
Citation: Lavefve, L., Brownmiller, C., Howard, L., Reeves, D., Adams, S.H., Chen, J., Diaz, E., Mauromoustakos, A. 2020. Changes in polyphenolics during storage of products prepared with freeze-dried wild blueberry powder. Foods. 9(4):466. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040466.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040466

Interpretive Summary: Fruits and vegetables are important components of a health diet pattern in children, and yet intakes are below recommendations in the majority of U.S. kids. Identifying foods and food products that are acceptable to children and contain important plant-based nutrients is important to consider strategies to increase fruit and vegetable intakes. It is also important that these foods retain important nutrients and factors throughout processing and storage. As an example, wild blueberry (WBB) powder can be added to the formulation of foods to promote consumption of health-promoting polyphenolics, but the stability of polyphenolics throughout storage needs to be addressed. Five WBB-containing foods, previously shown in taste tests to be enjoyable to by children, were examined (ice pop, oatmeal bar, graham cracker cookie, juice and gummy product). Samples stored at 21 degree C, 4.4 degree C, or -20 degree C (ice pops only) were analyzed at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks for polyphenolic and anthocyanin content (markers of healthful factors involved in anti-oxidant and other functions). Total anthocyanins decreased over storage and storage temperatures in all products. However, the ice pop and the refrigerated juice both retained 90% of their initial total anthocyanin content. The refrigerated oatmeal bar also showed good retention of anthocyanins (86%), but the gummy product retained only 43% and 51% when stored at 4.4 degree C or 21 degree C, respectively. Other plant-derived health-impacting factors, chlorogenic acid and flavonols, were generally more stable than anthocyanins throughout storage. The results set the stage for development of healthful food products containing WBB that can be eaten by children and may be used in studies that test the health effects of WBB.

Technical Abstract: Wild blueberry (WBB) powder can be added to the formulation of foods to promote consumption of health-promoting polyphenolics, but the stability of polyphenolics throughout storage is important. We determined the stability of polyphenolics in five products (ice pop, oatmeal bar, graham cracker cookie, juice and gummy product) prepared with WBB powder. Samples stored at 21 deg C, 4.4 deg C, or -20 deg C (ice pops only) were analyzed at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks for polyphenolic content and percent polymeric color. Total anthocyanins decreased over storage and storage temperatures in all products. However, the ice pop and the refrigerated juice both retained 90% of their initial total anthocyanin content. The refrigerated oatmeal bar also showed good retention of anthocyanins (86%), but the gummy product retained only 43% and 51% when stored at 4.4 deg C or 21 deg C, respectively. Chlorogenic acid and flavonols were generally more stable than anthocyanins throughout storage.