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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #372445

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Predict, Prevent and Control Disease Outbreaks Caused by Emerging Strains of Virulent Newcastle Disease Viruses

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Complete coding sequences of three chicken parvovirus isolates from the United States

Author
item GORAICHUK, IRYNA - Consultant
item DAVIS, JAMES - University Of Georgia
item Afonso, Claudio
item Suarez, David

Submitted to: Microbiology Resource Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/14/2020
Publication Date: 9/24/2020
Citation: Goraichuk, I.V., Davis, J.F., Afonso, C.L., Suarez, D.L. 2020. Complete coding sequences of three chicken parvovirus isolates from the United States. Microbiology Resource Announcements. 9. https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA

Interpretive Summary: Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) and turkey parvovirus (TuPV) are small, non-envelope DNA viruses of approximately 5.3 kilobase pairs in length. Both ChPV and TuPV are widespread in commercial chicken and turkey flocks across the world and are highly infectious in young poultry. Aveparvoviruses have been associated with the occurrence of malabsorption syndrome in chickens and enteritis in turkeys . Despite the proposed association, the participation of parvoviruses in such syndromes is unclear, since ChPV genomes have also been detected in healthy chickens. This study provides the full sequence of three chicken parvoviruses which will aid the understanding of these viruses in disease.

Technical Abstract: Parvoviruses are commonly found in U.S. poultry, and are associated with clinical disease. Here, we report the complete coding sequences of three chicken parvoviruses. The isolates were obtained from broiler chickens from commercial farms in the state of Georgia. Genomic sequence data from a collection of different isolates will facilitate vaccine development from flocks with sufficient metadata and can help in understanding the epidemiology of the virus and its association with clinical disease in the United States.