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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » WHGQ » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #370645

Research Project: Wheat Quality, Functionality and Marketablility in the Western U.S.

Location: Wheat Health, Genetics, and Quality Research

Title: Registration of ‘Purl’ soft white winter wheat

Author
item CARTER, ARRON - Washington State University
item BALOW, KERRY - Washington State University
item SHELTON, GARY - Washington State University
item BURKE, ADRIENNE - Washington State University
item HAGEMEYER, KYALL - Washington State University
item WORAPONG, JERRAPUN - Washington State University
item HIGGINBOTHAM, RYAN - Washington State University
item Chen, Xianming
item Engle, Douglas
item MURRAY, TIMOTHY - Washington State University
item Morris, Craig

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/28/2020
Publication Date: 10/5/2020
Citation: Carter, A.H., Balow, K.A., Shelton, G.B., Burke, A.B., Hagemeyer, K., Worapong, J., Higginbotham, R.W., Chen, X., Engle, D.A., Murray, T.D., Morris, C.F. 2020. Registration of ‘Purl’ soft white winter wheat. Journal of Plant Registrations. 14:398-405.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/plr2.20069

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this research was to develop a SWW wheat cultivar that combines effective resistance to current races of stripe rust with strawbreaker foot rot resistance and high yield potential across these two production regions, while maintaining acceptable end-use quality as compared to current cultivars grown in the intermediate to high rainfall regions of Washington State. ‘Purl’, a SWW wheat, was developed and released in March 2018 by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University. Purl was released as an alternative to ‘Puma’ and ‘UI Bruneau’ in rainfed wheat production systems in the intermediate to high rainfall regions of Washington State. Purl is named in honor of Ms. Jenny Hansen, who worked tirelessly using marker assisted selection at both Washington State University and the University of Idaho wheat breeding programs during her career. The release of Purl is based on its (i) high-temperature, adult-plant resistance to current races of stripe rust, (ii) strawbreaker foot rot resistance, and (iii) high grain yield potential across target production regions.

Technical Abstract: There are numerous traits soft white winter (SWW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars require to be successful in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. High yield potential, high grain volume weight, acceptable end-use quality, winter hardiness, resistance to Cephalosporium stripe (Cephalosporium gramineum Y. Nisik. & Ikata) and high falling number are just a few of the desired traits. Although many of these traits are driving factors towards releasing a new cultivar, there are two traits that are essential if a variety is to be successful in the Pacific Northwest, stripe rust resistance (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikss.) and strawbreaker foot rot resistance (Oculimacula yallundae Crous & W. Gams and O. acuformis Crous & W. Gams). The objective of this research was to develop a SWW cultivar with improved resistance to current stripe rust races, that carries genes for strawbreaker foot rot resistance, is winter hardy, and has high yield potential in the intermediate and high rainfall regions (>400 mm average annual precipitation) of eastern Washington. ‘Purl’ (Reg. No. CV-xxxx, PI xxxxxx) SWW wheat was developed and released in March 2018 by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University. Purl was tested under the experimental designations MAS08019-92-1-S-s and WA8234, which were assigned through progressive generations of advancement. Purl is a semi-dwarf cultivar adapted to intermediate to high rainfall (>400 mm of average annual precipitation) wheat production regions of Washington. Purl has high-temperature, adult-plant resistance to the current races of stripe rust, carries the Pch1 gene for strawbreaker foot rot, is intermediate in height, has mid-season maturity, and has high test weight and grain yield potential. Purl has end-use quality properties similar to those of ‘Stephens’, ‘Puma’, and ‘Madsen’.