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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #364068

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Assessing the temporal effects of Squash vein yellowing virus infection on settling and feeding behavior of Bemisia tabaci (MEAM1) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

Author
item Shrestha, Deepak - University Of Florida
item Mcauslane, Heather - University Of Florida
item Ebert, Timothy - University Of Florida
item Cervantes, Felix - Bayer Cropscience
item Adkins, Scott
item Smith, Hugh - University Of Florida
item Dufault, Nicholas - University Of Florida
item Webb, Susan - University Of Florida

Submitted to: Journal of Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/8/2019
Publication Date: 5/14/2019
Citation: Shrestha, D., McAuslane, H.J., Ebert, T.A., Cervantes, F.A., Adkins, S.T., Smith, H.A., Dufault, N., Webb, S.E. 2019. Assessing the temporal effects of Squash vein yellowing virus infection on settling and feeding behavior of Bemisia tabaci (MEAM1) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Journal of Insect Science. 19(3):5, 1-7. https://doi.org/10.1093/jisesa/iez036.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jisesa/iez036

Interpretive Summary: Insect vector behavior and biology can be affected by pathogen-induced changes of the host plant. Effects of Squash vein yellowing virus infection on its whitefly vector were examined. Settling, oviposition and feeding behavior were specifically analyzed. Results highlight the need to examine plant disease progression and its effect on vector behavior and performance.

Technical Abstract: Behavior and biology of insect vectors of plant pathogens can be affected by pathogen-induced changes in the physiology and morphology of the host plant. Temporal effects of Squash vein yellowing virus infection on the settling, oviposition preference and feeding behavior of its whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci, were examined. At 10-12 days post-inoculation, whiteflies initially settled on infected plants but then preference of settling shifted to mock-inoculated plants. These results demonstrate the need to examine the effect of plant pathogens on vector behavior and performance.