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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #361764

Research Project: Identification of Disease Mechanisms and Control Strategies for Viral Respiratory Pathogens of Ruminants

Location: Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research

Title: Neonatal calves as a model of human RSV infection

Author
item Guerra-maupome, Mariana - Iowa State University
item Palmer, Mitchell
item Mcgill, Jodi - Iowa State University
item Sacco, Randy

Submitted to: Vaccines
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/4/2019
Publication Date: 1/8/2019
Citation: Guerra-Maupome, M., Palmer, M.V., Mcgill, J.L., Sacco, R.E. 2019. Utility of the neonatal calf model for testing vaccines and intervention strategies for use against human RSV infection. Vaccines. 7(1):7. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines7010007.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines7010007

Interpretive Summary: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of pneumonia in young calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a role shipping fever, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children, such as an age-dependent susceptibility. In addition, similar lesions are observed. This invited review summarizes available data that provide parallels between bovine RSV infection in calves and human RSV in infants.

Technical Abstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in up to 200,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Importantly, infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children. Herein, we update our current understanding of RSV infection in cattle, with particular focus on similarities between the calf and human infection, and the recent reports in which the neonatal calf has been employed for the development and testing of vaccines and therapeutics which may be applied to hRSV infection in humans.