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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Houma, Louisiana » Sugarcane Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #359136

Research Project: Integrated Weed and Insect Pest Management Systems for Sustainable Sugarcane Production

Location: Sugarcane Research

Title: Sugarcane cultivar response to glyphosate and trinexapac-ethyl ripeners in Louisiana

Author
item Spaunhorst, Douglas
item Todd, James
item Hale, Anna

Submitted to: PLoS ONE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/6/2019
Publication Date: 6/20/2019
Citation: Spaunhorst, D.J., Todd, J.R., Hale, A.L. 2019. Sugarcane cultivar response to glyphosate and trinexapac-ethyl ripeners in Louisiana. PLoS One. 14(6):e0218656. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218656.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218656

Interpretive Summary: Grinding sugarcane in late-September or early-October when sugar concentrations are low is necessary in order for the entire state’s crop to be milled. Application of sugarcane ripeners is necessary to increase sugar levels in early-season harvested sugarcane. The response of nine sugarcane cultivar’s yield components to glyphosate and trinexapac-ethyl ripeners was determined in field trials. Glyphosate and trinexapac-ethyl treatments did not increase sugar yields more than non-ripened sugarcane. Sugarcane ripened with glyphosate or trinexapac-ethyl increased theoretical recoverable sugar (TRS), the amount of sugar per ton of cane, 4 to 12% more than non-ripened sugarcane in seven out of nine cultivars, but greater TRS values were offset by lighter sugarcane stalks. Sugarcane treated with ripeners were shorter in height, but this may benefit growers by allowing them to harvest more sugarcane acres to meet their daily load quota and exposes fewer acres to a freeze event. The cultivars HoCP 00-950, Ho 09-804, and HoCP 09-840 were not responsive to glyphosate or trinexapac-ethyl ripeners and should not be treated with ripeners if the crop will be harvested the next year. A delayed harvest from 28 to 49 days after treatment (DAT) corresponded to greater TRS values and 17% more sucrose yield.

Technical Abstract: Sugarcane ripening in Louisiana is necessary to ensure adequate sucrose levels in early-season harvested sugarcane. The response of nine sugarcane cultivar’s yield components to glyphosate and trinexapac-ethyl ripeners was determined in field trials. Glyphosate (210 g ae ha-1) and trinexapac-ethyl (200 g ai ha-1) treatments failed to increase sucrose yields more than non-ripened sugarcane. Sugarcane ripened with glyphosate or trinexapac-ethyl increased theoretical recoverable sucrose (TRS) 4 to 12% more than non-ripened sugarcane in seven out of nine cultivars, but greater TRS values were counterpoised by lower sugarcane stalk weight. An unintentional consequence of reduced late-season vegetative growth may benefit growers by allowing them to harvest more sugarcane hectares to meet their daily load quota and exposes fewer hectares to a freeze event. The cultivars HoCP 00-950, Ho 09-804, and HoCP 09-840 were not responsive to glyphosate or trinexapac-ethyl ripeners and should not be treated if subsequent ratoons will be harvested. A delayed harvest from 28 to 49 days after treatment (DAT) coincided with greater TRS values and 17% more sucrose yield.