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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Mycotoxin Prevention and Applied Microbiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #353027

Research Project: Novel Methods for Controlling Trichothecene Contamination of Grain and Improving the Climate Resilience of Food Safety and Security Programs

Location: Mycotoxin Prevention and Applied Microbiology Research

Title: Effects of elevated CO2 and warmer temperature on wheat and corn susceptibility to Fusarium graminearum and deoxynivalenol contamination

Author
item Mcconnell, Keegan - Volunteer
item Mccormick, Susan
item Hao, Guixia
item Bakker, Matthew
item Vaughan, Martha

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/6/2018
Publication Date: 6/6/2018
Citation: McConnell, K., McCormick, S.P., Hao, G., Bakker, M.G., Vaughan, M.M. 2018. Effects of elevated CO2 and warmer temperature on wheat and corn susceptibility to Fusarium graminearum and deoxynivalenol contamination [abstract].

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Fusarium graminearum is a devastating fungal pathogen of cereal crops, such as wheat and corn. Disease can significantly reduce crop yield and contaminate grain with trichothecene mycotoxins that are harmful to plants, animals and humans. The severity of disease epidemics and accumulation of mycotoxins is strongly associated with weather, and climate changes are predicted to increase the risk of disease in many grain growing regions of the world. Although it is well established that wheat (C3) and corn (C4) plants respond differently to climate changes, particularly elevated atmospheric CO2, the affect these differences have on their susceptibility to Fusarium graminearum and mycotoxin contamination is unknown. In this study we compare disease development and deoxynivalenol (DON) production of two Fusarium graminearum strains on wheat and corn at ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (1000 ppm) CO2 concentrations under cool (20°C/18°C) and warm (25°C/23°C) temperature conditions.