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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Food and Feed Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352355

Research Project: Ecological Reservoirs and Intervention Strategies to Reduce Foodborne Pathogens in Cattle and Swine

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: The effects of hydrolysed sorghum on growth performance and meat quality of rabbits

Author
item Hernández-martínez, Carlos - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon
item Treviño-cabrera, Griselda - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon
item Hernández-luna, Carlos - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon
item Silva-vázquez, Ramon - Centro De Investigacio Para Los Recursos Naturales
item Gutiérrez-soto, Guadalupe - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon
item Hume, Michael
item Méndez-zamora, Gerardo - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon

Submitted to: World Rabbit Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/7/2017
Publication Date: 6/1/2018
Citation: Hernández-Martínez, C.A., Treviño-Cabrera, G.F., Hernández-Luna, C.E., Silva-Vázquez, R., Gutiérrez-Soto, G., Hume, M.E., Méndez-Zamora, G. 2018. The effects of hydrolysed sorghum on growth performance and meat quality of rabbits. World Rabbit Science. 26(2):155-163. https://doi.org/10.4995/wrs.2018.7822.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4995/wrs.2018.7822

Interpretive Summary: The effect of sorghum treated with enzymes from two fungi was evaluated on rabbit growth and meat quality. New Zealand rabbits at 20 days of age were allocated in two treatments: T1 (non-enzyme-treated sorghum) and T2 (enzyme-treated sorghum). The amount of feed intake was similar for the two groups. Carcass characteristics were also not significantly different between the two groups. Although the pH, water content, color, and cooking loss of the back meat were not different between treatments, the pH of the leg meat was higher in T2 than in T1. Meat hardness and gumminess in T2 were lower in comparison to meat from T1. In conclusion, enzyme-treated sorghum did not improve rabbit weight and feed intake. While differences were not observed on growth performance, hardness and gumminess values suggest that rabbit meat T2 was softer. Thus, sorghum treated with enzymes from the two fungi contributed to a better meat texture. These results are of interest to rabbit growers and researchers seeking to improve meat quality through improved nutrition.

Technical Abstract: The effect of sorghum hydrolyzed by Trametes maxima CU1 and Pycnoporus sanguineus CS2 was evaluated on growth performance parameters and rabbit meat quality. A total of 24 unsexed New Zealand rabbits, weaned at 20 d of age, were allocated in two treatments: T1 (non-hydrolyzed sorghum) and T2 (hydrolyzed sorghum by Trametes maxima CU1 and Pycnoporus sanguineus CS2). Rabbits of group T2 did not have significantly lower feed intake compared to those in T1. Carcass traits were also not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). Although the pH, water-holding capacity, color, and cooking loss of the Longissimus dorsi were not different between treatments (P>0.05), the pH of the rabbits Biceps femoris was higher in T2 (6.21; P<0.05) than in T1 (6.14; P<0.05). Meat hardness and gumminess in T2 were lower in comparison to meat from T1 (P<0.05). The effect of hydrolyzed sorghum on rabbit weight and feed intake was not significant. While, significant differences were not observed on growth performance parameters, the hardness and gumminess values suggest that rabbit meat T2 was softer. Thus, sorghum hydrolyzed by Trametes maxima CU1 and Pycnoporus sanguineus CS2 contributed to a better meat texture.