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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #349418

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Predicting the presence of whiteflies and tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Florida tomato fields

Author
item Turechek, William
item Adkins, Scott
item Mellinger, Charlie - Glades Crop Care
item Anco, Dan - Clemson University

Submitted to: International Congress of Plant Pathology Abstracts and Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/8/2017
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Florida is one of the leading states for production of fresh market tomatoes. Production is severely affected by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The objective of this study was to identify landscape and climatic factors that drive whitefly populations and TYLCV incidence in commercial tomato in southwest Florida. Analyses showed that the incidence of TYLCV followed closely the increase in mean whitefly density and the average field age. A strong correlation between disease and insect pressure was found in neighboring fields. Whitefly density was best predicted by average temperature, relative humidity, and vapor pressure deficit; TYLCV incidence was best predicted by temperature relative humidity, and maximum wind speed. Identifying key weather variables and geographical hot spots will enable us to develop and implement novel strategies for management of whiteflies and TYLCV.

Technical Abstract: Florida is one of the leading states for production of fresh market tomatoes. Production is severely affected by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The objective of this study was to identify landscape and climatic factors that drive whitefly populations and TYLCV incidence in commercial tomato in southwest Florida. Scouting reports were submitted by cooperating growers located across 24,000 acres in southwest Florida from 2006-2013. Daily weather data was obtained from several local weather stations. Moran’s I was used to assess spatial relationships over the area, and polynomial distributed lag regression was used to determine the relationship between weather variables, whiteflies, and TYLCV. Analyses showed that the incidence of TYLCV followed closely the increase in mean whitefly density and the average field age. A strong correlation between disease and insect pressure was found in neighboring fields, extending to 2nd and 3rd order neighbors. Whitefly density was best predicted by the number of days with an average temperature between 16 and 24 C (T16to24) and relative humidity (RH) over the last 31 days and vapor pressure deficit over the last 8 days. TYLCV incidence was best predicted by T16to24, RH, and maximum wind speed over the last 31 days. Identifying key weather variables and geographical hot spots will enable us to develop and implement novel strategies for management of whiteflies and TYLCV.