Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Houma, Louisiana » Sugarcane Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347656

Research Project: The Effects of Water-Driven Processes on Sugarcane Production Systems and Associated Ecosystem Services in Louisiana

Location: Sugarcane Research

Title: Sugarcane crop residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on oat (Avena sative L.), tall morningglory (Ipomoea purpurea L. Roth), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) germination

Author
item Webber Iii, Charles
item White, Paul
item Spaunhorst, Douglas
item Wayment, Darcey - Nicholls State University
item Landrum, Derek - Former ARS Employee

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/2/2017
Publication Date: 1/15/2018
Citation: Webber III, C.L., White Jr, P.M., Spaunhorst, D.J., Wayment, D.G., Landrum, D.S. 2018. Sugarcane crop residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on oat (Avena sative L.), tall morningglory (Ipomoea purpurea L. Roth), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) germination. Journal of Agricultural Science. 10(2):15-22. https://doi.org/10.5539/jas.v10n2p15.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5539/jas.v10n2p15

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) field residue and bagasse extracts on seed germination of oat (Avena sative L.), morningglory (Ipomoea purpurea L.), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.). Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development of other crops or weed species. The seeds were treated with 5 extract concentrations (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 g/L) from either sugarcane field residue or sugarcane bagasse. The oat (Avena sativa L.) germination was not affected by either the source of the leachate or the leachate concentration. This was in contrast to earlier research that resulted in a decrease in germination for a different oat species “naked oat” (Avena nuda L.) Viator et al. (2006). The differences in the impact of the leachates on germination may be a result of using different oat species and/or sugarcane varieties. Future research should use both sugarcane varieties and evaluate germination on both oat species. Germination for both weed species, morningglory (Ipomoea purpurea L.) and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), were adversely affected by leachate source and concentration. In both cases, the sugarcane field residue leachates had a greater deleterious impact on germination than did the bagasse leachate. The response to the leachates was more consistent and severe on morningglory germination than on redroot pigweed germination. Future research should investigate the allelopathic compounds present in the sugarcane field residue and bagasse, determine if the same allelopathic compounds are present and in the same concentration among other sugarcane varieties, and further examine which weed and crop species may be vulnerable to the allelopathic compounds present sugarcane field residue and bagasse.

Technical Abstract: Allelopathy, the chemical interaction between plants, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development, and can include compounds released from a crop that adversely impact crop or weed species. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) field residue and bagasse extracts on seed germination of three plant species. Oat (Avena sative L.) var. ‘Corral’, morningglory (Ipomoea purpurea L.), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.) seeds were treated with 5 extract concentrations (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 g/L) from either sugarcane field residue or sugarcane bagasse. The impact of leachates from sugarcane variety ‘HoCP 96-540’ field residue and sugarcane bagasse differed by the species evaluated (oat, morningglory, and redroot pigweed), the leachate source (field residue vs. bagasse), and leachate concentration (0 to 100 g/L). The oat germination was not affected by either the source of the leachate or the leachate concentration. Germination for both weed species, morningglory and redroot pigweed, were adversely affected by leachate source and concentration. In both cases, the sugarcane field residue leachate had a greater deleterious impact on germination than did the bagasse leachate. The response to the leachates was more consistent and severe for morningglory germination than redroot pigweed germination. Averaged across experiments, the 12.5 g/L field residue concentration decreased the morningglory germination to 17.0% compared to 34% germination for the bagasse leachate, and the 100 g/L residue concentration reduce germination to 6% compared to 18.5% for bagasse 100 g/L bagasse concentration. The 100 g/L concentration of field residue reduced redroot pigweed germination by 13% (Experiment 1) and 27% (Experiment 2), while the bagasse leachate reduced germination by 5% (Experiment 1) and 15% (Experiment 2). Future research should investigate the allelopathic compounds present in the sugarcane field residue and bagasse, determine if the same allelopathic compounds are present and in the same concentration among other sugarcane varieties, and further examine which weed and crop species may be vulnerable to the allelopathic compounds present sugarcane field residue and bagasse.