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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fayetteville, Arkansas » Poultry Production and Product Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345514

Research Project: Quantifying Air and Water Quality Benefits of Improved Poultry Manure Management Practices

Location: Poultry Production and Product Safety Research

Title: Effect of humic acids on intestinal viscosity, leaky gut and ammonia excretion in a 24 h feed restriction model to induce intestinal permeability in broiler chickens

Author
item Maguey, Jesus - Autonomous National University Of Mexico
item Michel, Matias - Centro De Investigaciones En Ciencias Veterinarias Y Agronómicas (CICVYA)
item Baxter, Michael - University Of Arkansas
item Tellex, Jr, Guillermo - University Of Arkansas
item Moore, Philip
item Solis-cruz, Bruno - Autonomous National University Of Mexico
item Hernandez-patlan, Daniel - Autonomous National University Of Mexico
item Merino-guzman, Ruben - Departamento De Zootecnia

Submitted to: Animal Science Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/16/2018
Publication Date: 6/1/2018
Citation: Maguey, J., Michel, M.A., Baxter, M., Tellex, Jr, G., Moore Jr, P.A., Solis-Cruz, B., Hernandez-Patlan, D., Merino-Guzman, R. 2018. Effect of humic acids on intestinal viscosity, leaky gut and ammonia excretion in a 24 h feed restriction model to induce intestinal permeability in broiler chickens. Animal Science Journal. 89:1002-1010. https://doi.org/10.1111/asj.13011.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/asj.13011

Interpretive Summary: Humic acids are produced by biodegradation of organic matte, hence, they are a complex mixture of many different acids containing carboxyl and phenolate groups. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of humic acid in broiler chicken diets on intestinal viscosity, leaky gut and ammonia excretion in a 24 h feed restriction model to induce intestinal permeability. One-day old male broiler chickens were randomly allocated to one of two groups with or without 0.2% humic acid from worm-compost, and placed in brooder batteries in a controlled age-appropriate environment, where they had ad libitum access to water and feed for 14 days. Intestinal permeability was induced by 24 h feed restriction starting at two weeks of age. At 15 d of age, chickens were given an appropriate dose of FITC-d by oral gavage. Intestine and liver samples were also collected to evaluate viscosity and liver bacterial translocation. A significant increase in intestinal viscosity was observed in the experimental group consuming 0.2 % humic acid when compared with control non-treated group. Treated group, also showed a significant reduction in FITC-d, liver bacterial translocation and ammonia in the manure when compared with control non-treated group. These results suggest that humic acid has a positive impact in intestinal integrity in broiler chickens.

Technical Abstract: Humic acids (HA) are produced by biodegradation of organic matter that involves physical, chemical and microbiological processes, hence, HA are a complex mixture of many different acids containing carboxyl and phenolate groups. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of HA on intestinal viscosity, leaky gut and ammonia excretion in a 24 h feed restriction model to induce intestinal permeability in broiler chickens. One-day old male Cobb-Vantress broiler chickens were randomly allocated to one of two groups (n = 25 chickens), with or without 0.2% of isolated HA from worm-compost, and placed in brooder batteries in a controlled age-appropriate environment. Chicks had ad libitum access to water and feed for 14 days. Intestinal permeability was induced by 24 h feed restriction starting at 14 d. At 15 d of age, chickens in both groups were given an appropriate dose of FITC-d by oral gavage. Intestine and liver samples were also collected to evaluate viscosity and liver bacterial translocation (BT). A significant increase (P < 0.05) in intestinal viscosity was observed in the experimental group consuming 0.2 % of HA when compared with control non-treated group. Treated group, also showed a significant reduction in FITC-d, liver BT and ammonia in the manure when compared with control non-treated group. These results suggest that HA have a positive impact in intestinal integrity in broiler chickens.