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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Nutrient Data Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344709

Research Project: USDA Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database

Location: Nutrient Data Laboratory

Title: Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) release 4.0

Author
item Andrews, Karen - University Of Maryland
item Dang, Phuong-tan - University Of Maryland
item Mcneal, Malikah - University Of Maryland
item Gusev, Pavel - University Of Maryland
item Savarala, Sushma - University Of Maryland
item Oh, Laura - University Of Maryland
item Atkinson, Renata
item Pehrsson, Pamela
item Douglass, Larry - Consultant
item Dwyer, Johanna - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item Saldanha, Leila - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item Betz, Joseph - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)
item Coates, Paul - National Institutes Of Health (NIH)

Submitted to: USDA Online Publication
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/24/2017
Publication Date: 8/24/2017
Citation: Andrews, K.W., Dang, P., Mcneal, M., Gusev, P.A., Savarala, S., Oh, L., Atkinson, R.L., Pehrsson, P.R., Douglass, L.W., Dwyer, J.T., Saldanha, L.G., Betz, J.M., Coates, P.M. 2017. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) release 4.0. USDA Online Publication. 0000.

Interpretive Summary: Nearly half of U.S. adults report taking dietary supplements (DS). A single serving of a DS may contain amounts of nutrients or other bioactive compounds that exceed their concentration in foods. During the manufacturing of DS, ingredients may be added in amounts exceeding the label claims in order to compensate for losses during shelf life. However, these amounts are not standardized for specific ingredients or among the different manufacturers. DSID pilot studies have also identified a number of ingredients in a variety of product categories with mean content below label claims. Thus, actual ingredient amounts are unknown to consumers and researchers. Epidemiological studies of nutrient intake and health currently use the manufacturer's label as the source of information on ingredient content in dietary supplements. In order to provide a tool to more accurately estimate intakes from dietary supplements, an analytically validated database for high priority ingredients in dietary supplement products has been developed. The Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID; https://dsid.usda.nih.gov) is a collaboration of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS)/ Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) with other federal partners. For national DSID studies, representative supplement products are purchased and tested by experienced laboratories for their ingredient content. The DSID provides analytically-derived estimates of the ingredient content in DS commonly sold and purchased in the United States. DSID 4.0 includes estimates of ingredient content in 4 categories of DS: adult, children's and non-prescription prenatal multivitamin/mineral products (MVM) and omega-3 fatty acid DS. With release four of the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID-4), we expand the DSID to include botanical DSs for the first time, including a research summary and pilot study results for green tea DS. We report on our second adult MVM national study- adult MVM-2017, with its data links to the 2009-14 NHANES data files and a new adult MVM-2017 online calculator. For adult MVMs, we report national estimates of ingredient content for vitamin A, vitamin D and chromium for the first time. In addition, a calculator function is added for the omega-3 fatty acid DS estimates, and additional NHANES linking tables are provided for non-prescription prenatal MVMs. The DSID mean estimates can replace label information in studies assessing the dietary intake of the U.S. population from DS. These data are most appropriate for use in population studies of nutrient intake rather than for assessing individual products.

Technical Abstract: Nearly half of U.S. adults report taking dietary supplements (DS). A single serving of a DS may contain amounts of nutrients or other bioactive compounds that exceed their concentration in foods. During the manufacturing of DS, ingredients may be added in amounts exceeding the label claims in order to compensate for losses during shelf life. However, these amounts are not standardized for specific ingredients or among the different manufacturers. DSID pilot studies have also identified a number of ingredients in a variety of product categories with mean content below label claims. Thus, actual ingredient amounts are unknown to consumers and researchers. Epidemiological studies of nutrient intake and health currently use the manufacturer's label as the source of information on ingredient content in dietary supplements. In order to provide a tool to more accurately estimate intakes from dietary supplements, an analytically validated database for high priority ingredients in dietary supplement products has been developed. The Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID; https://dsid.usda.nih.gov) is a collaboration of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS)/ Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) with other federal partners. For national DSID studies, representative supplement products are purchased and tested by experienced laboratories for their ingredient content. The DSID provides analytically-derived estimates of the ingredient content in DS commonly sold and purchased in the United States. DSID 4.0 includes estimates of ingredient content in 4 categories of DS: adult, children's and non-prescription prenatal multivitamin/mineral products (MVM) and omega-3 fatty acid DS. With release four of the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID-4), we expand the DSID to include botanical DSs for the first time, including a research summary and pilot study results for green tea DS. We report on our second adult MVM national study- adult MVM-2017, with its data links to the 2009-14 NHANES data files and a new adult MVM-2017 online calculator. For adult MVMs, we report national estimates of ingredient content for vitamin A, vitamin D and chromium for the first time. In addition, a calculator function is added for the omega-3 fatty acid DS estimates, and additional NHANES linking tables are provided for non-prescription prenatal MVMs. The DSID mean estimates can replace label information in studies assessing the dietary intake of the U.S. population from DS. These data are most appropriate for use in population studies of nutrient intake rather than for assessing individual products.