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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Houma, Louisiana » Sugarcane Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344139

Research Project: The Effects of Water-Driven Processes on Sugarcane Production Systems and Associated Ecosystem Services in Louisiana

Location: Sugarcane Research

Title: Sugarcane field residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on vegetable seed germination

Author
item Webber Iii, Charles
item White, Paul
item Landrum, Derek
item Spaunhorst, Douglas
item Wayment, Darcey - Nicholls State University

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/3/2017
Publication Date: 10/15/2017
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5852197
Citation: Webber III, C.L., White Jr, P.M., Landrum, D.S., Spaunhorst, D.J., Wayment, D.G. 2017. Sugarcane field residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on vegetable seed germination. Journal of Agricultural Science. 9(11):10-16.

Interpretive Summary: Allelopathy as coined and defined by Molisch in 1937 is the biochemical interaction between plants, whether inhibiting or stimulating plant growth and development. Many plant species produce compounds that when released into the environment can impact the growth and development of other plants. These compounds may be produced in a plant’s leaves, stems, or roots, and either exuded from the plant part, leached from the material, or transformed by microbial activity to become allelopathic. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) var. ‘HoCP 96-540’ field residue and sugarcane bagasse extracts on seed germination of three vegetable crops. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. alboglabra Bailey), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)] seeds were treated with 4 extract concentrations (0, 16.7, 33.3, and 66.7 g/L) from either sugarcane field residue or sugarcane bagasse extracts. Seed germination of tomato, Chinese kale, and cucumber decreased as concentration of sugarcane residue extracts increased. At the highest residue concentration (66.7 g/L), germination decreased by 44%, 82%, and 88% for tomato, Chinese kale, and cucumber, respectively. Sugarcane bagasse extracts had minimal impact on seed germination of the tested species. Only in one tomato experiment did the bagasse extracts decreased germination, and then only by 13%. Future research should investigate the presence of allelopathic compounds in sugarcane field residue and determine if the concentration of allelopathic chemicals vary by sugarcane variety.

Technical Abstract: The chemical interaction between plants, which is referred to as allelopathy, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) var. ‘HoCP 96-540’ field residue and sugarcane bagasse extracts on seed germination of three vegetable crops. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. alboglabra Bailey), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)] seeds were treated with 4 extract concentrations (0, 16.7, 33.3, and 66.7 g/L) from either sugarcane field residue or sugarcane bagasse extracts. Seed germination of tomato, Chinese kale, and cucumber decreased as concentration of sugarcane residue extracts increased. At the highest residue concentration (66.7 g/L), germination decreased by 44%, 82%, and 88% for tomato, Chinese kale, and cucumber, respectively. Sugarcane bagasse extracts had minimal impact on seed germination of the tested species. Only in one tomato experiment did the bagasse extracts decreased germination, and then only by 13%. Future research should investigate the presence of allelopathic compounds in sugarcane field residue and determine if the concentration of allelopathic chemicals vary by sugarcane variety.