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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Mosquito and Fly Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344129

Research Project: Biting Arthropod Surveillance and Control

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research

Title: Truck mounted Natular 2EC (spinosad) ULV residual treatment in a simulated urban environment to control Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in North Florida

Author
item Aldridge, Robert
item Golden, Frances
item Britch, Seth
item Blersch, Jessika - Department Of Defense
item Linthicum, Kenneth - Ken

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/8/2018
Publication Date: 3/23/2018
Citation: Aldridge, R.L., Golden, F.V., Britch, S.C., Blersch, J., Linthicum, K. 2018. Truck mounted Natular 2EC (spinosad) ULV residual treatment in a simulated urban environment to control Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in North Florida. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 34(1):53-57. doi:10.2987/17-6697R.1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2987/17-6697R.1

Interpretive Summary: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes can transmit human diseases such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Adult mosquitoes are difficult to control; however; the immatures of these mosquitoes may be easier to target because they occur in relatively small containers that hold water. Although it is difficult to locate and individually reduce the large numbers of artificial and natural containers that can harbor mosquitoes using methods such as source reduction, treatment of an area with a sprays that targets immature stages may prove to be an effective control measure to target a range of habitats. We exposed plastic cups placed in a variety of open and protected locations to bio-pesticide via a truck-mounted sprayer in a simulated urban setting in North Florida. The containers were then returned to the laboratory for the addition of water and mosquito larvae. Control was measured by the number of adult mosquitoes that emerged from treated cups. We discuss our results in the context of control in key urban regions of the US.

Technical Abstract: Populations of adult Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes are notoriously difficult to target and control, and are key vectors of Zika, dengue, and chikungunya viruses. Larval populations of these species may be easier to target due to their restricted presence in relatively small water holding containers. However, the numbers of artificial and natural containers that can be exploited by these species, can render control methods, such as source reduction, ineffective. Alternatively, preemptive treatment of an area with a ULV residual larvicide may prove to be an effective measure of control to target a range of habitats. We exposed dry artificial containers placed in a variety of open and protected locations to Natular 2EC (spinosad) larvicide with a truck-mounted ULV sprayer in a simulated urban setting in North Florida. The containers were then returned to the laboratory for the addition of water and Ae. aegypti or Ae. albopictus larvae. Efficacy was measured by the number of adult mosquitoes that emerged from treated cups. We discuss our results in the context of control of these two species in key urban regions of the US.