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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342364

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Prevent and Control Disease Outbreaks Caused by Emerging Strains of Avian Influenza Viruses

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, Tennessee, USA, March 2017

Author
item Lee Dong-hun - Orise Fellow
item Torchetti, Mia - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Killian, Mary - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Berhane, Yohannes - Canadian Food Inspection Agency
item Swayne, David

Submitted to: Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/2/2017
Publication Date: 11/1/2017
Citation: Lee Dong-Hun, Torchetti, M.K., Killian, M.L., Berhane, Y., Swayne, D.E. 2017. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, Tennessee, USA, March 2017. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 23(11):1860-1863. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2311.171013.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2311.171013

Interpretive Summary: The deadly form of avian influenza (highly pathogenic avian influenza) was detected in chickens in Tennessee during March 2017. Examination for other avian influenza viruses in the area and genetic analysis of such viruses supports multiple independent introductions of a mild avian influenza virus (low pathogenicity avian influenza) from wild bird to farms at the border of Tennessee and Alabama. On one farm, the mild form changed to the deadly for by mutation and subsequent spread to a second farm.

Technical Abstract: In March 2017, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) was detected at 2 poultry farms in Tennessee, USA. Surveillance data and genetic analyses indicated multiple introductions of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus before mutation to high pathogenicity and interfarm transmission. Poultry surveillance should continue because low pathogenicity viruses circulate and spill over into commercial poultry.