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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342350

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Tomato chlorotic spot virus Identified in Marsdenia floribunda in Florida

Author
item Dey, K.k. - Florida Department Of Agriculture
item Melzer, M.j. - University Of Hawaii
item Xiaoan, S - Florida Department Of Agriculture
item Adkins, Scott

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/2/2017
Publication Date: 7/6/2017
Citation: Dey, K., Melzer, M., Xiaoan, S., Adkins, S.T. 2017. Tomato chlorotic spot virus Identified in Marsdenia floribunda in Florida. Plant Health Progress. 18:144-145. doi:10.1094/PHP-05-17-0030-BR.

Interpretive Summary: Marsdenia floribunda, commonly known as Madagascar jasmine, is a flowering plant grown as an ornamental crop in sub-tropical and tropical regions. In September 2016, M. floribunda plants with typical tospovirus symptoms were found in a Miami-Dade County, Florida nursery. Diagnostic testing demonstrated infection with Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV), an emerging tospovirus in commercial ornamental and vegetable production in Florida. In this report, we document M. floribunda as a new TCSV host in Florida to share this important information with growers, Extension personnel, crop consultants, and regulatory and research scientists in Florida and the Caribbean.

Technical Abstract: Ornamental crops including hoya, annual vinca and portulaca have recently been identified with Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) infections in Florida. Observations of Marsdenia floribunda, commonly known as Madagascar jasmine, in September 2016 revealed TCSV-like symptoms. Testing of these symptomatic plants by multiple diagnostic methods demonstrated M. floribunda as a new host of TCSV in Florida.