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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342133

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Host-mediated effects of semipersistently transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus on sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) behavior and fitness

Author
item Shrestha, D - University Of Florida
item Mcauslane, H.j. - University Of Florida
item Adkins, Scott
item Smith, H.a. - University Of Florida
item Dufault, N - University Of Florida
item Colee, J - University Of Florida
item Webb, S.e. - University Of Florida

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/23/2017
Publication Date: 6/20/2017
Citation: Shrestha, D., McAuslane, H., Adkins, S.T., Smith, H., Dufault, N., Colee, J., Webb, S. 2017. Host-mediated effects of semipersistently transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus on sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) behavior and fitness. Journal of Economic Entomology. pp. 1-9. doi:10.1093/jee/tox161.

Interpretive Summary: Plant viruses may indirectly affect insect vector behavior and fitness via a shared host plant. In this research, we evaluated the host-mediated effects of Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) on the behavior and fitness of its whitefly vector on squash and watermelon. Host-mediated effects of SqVYV infection on whitefly behavior differed on squash and watermelon suggesting the potential for more rapid spread of virus in watermelon fields.

Technical Abstract: Alighting, settling and oviposition behavioral assays were conducted on Squash vein yellowing virus- (SqVYV-) infected and mock-inoculated squash and watermelon plants. Developmental time of immature stages, adult longevity, and fecundity were measured on SqVYV-infected and mock-inoculated squash plants. For adult longevity and fecundity, whiteflies were reared on SqVYV-infected and mock-inoculated squash plants to determine the effects of nymphal rearing host on the adult stage. Differences in the host-mediated effects of SqVYV infection on whitefly behavior suggest that SqVYV may spread more rapidly in watermelon fields.