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Research Project: Investigation of Immunoregulation in Reducing Foodborne Pathogen Colonization in Poultry

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: The first 30 years of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in cattle production: Incidence, preharvest ecology, and management

Author
item Swaggerty, Christina - Christi
item Corcionivoschi, Nicolae - Agri-food And Biosciences Institute
item Ricke, Steven - University Of Arkansas
item Callaway, Todd

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/19/2017
Publication Date: 12/1/2017
Citation: Swaggerty, C.L., Corcionivoschi, N., Ricke, S.C., Callaway, T.R. 2017. The first 30 years of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in cattle production: Incidence, preharvest ecology, and management. In: Ricke, S.C., Atungulu, G.G., Rainwater, C.E., Park, S.H., editors. Food and Feed Safety Systems and Analysis. Academic Press. 1(7):117-131.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Of the 700 serotypes of Escherichia coli, most are commensal; however, some range from mildly to highly pathogenic and can cause death. The disease-causing enterovirulent E. coli are classified as: Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). EHEC are referred to as Verocytotoxin E. coli (VTEC) or Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), but will be referred to as STEC. STEC are leading causes of foodborne illness in the United States, resulting in 175,000 illness and 20 deaths per year. Historically, STEC illnesses are associated with handling/consuming contaminated or undercooked beef. There are several STEC, but E. coli O157:H7 is the most recognized. The gastrointestinal tracts of cattle are natural STEC reservoirs, and this co-evolution has equipped them to survive as commensals. Managing the incidence and understanding the ecology of these foodborne pathogens is critical in minimizing future risks to humans.