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Research Project: Enhancing Environmental Quality and Ecosystem Services in Southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain Agricultural Watersheds

Location: Southeast Watershed Research

Title: 25 years of economic research on non-timber forest products in the United States: History, trends, status, and future priorities

Author
item Alexander, Susan - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Frey, Gregory - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Blatner, Keith - Washington State University
item Jacobson, Michael - Pennsylvania State University
item Sills, Erin - North Carolina State University
item Mercer, Evan - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Downes, Meghan - New Mexico State University
item Emery, Marla - Us Forest Service (FS)
item Gold, Michael - University Of Missouri
item Godsey, Larry - Missouri Valley College
item Coffin, Alisa

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/31/2017
Publication Date: 6/12/2017
Citation: Alexander, S., Frey, G., Blatner, K., Jacobson, M., Sills, E., Mercer, E., Downes, M., Emery, M., Gold, M., Godsey, L., Coffin, A.W. 2017. 25 years of economic research on non-timber forest products in the United States: History, trends, status, and future priorities [abstract]. Presented at International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Division 5 Conference 2017: June 12-16, 2017, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Interpretive Summary: Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) are one of many economic benefits that forests provide to society, and understanding their value helps us understand the total economic value of forests. In the early 1990s, economic research on NTFPs in the United States increased, in the Pacific Northwest and other regions including the Southeast, Northeast, and North Central U.S. Research has addressed markets, economic impacts, forest farming returns, recreational collection, and subsistence and personal use. However, a consistent understanding of how NTFPs benefit individuals, communities, and regions across the U.S. has been stymied in large part to the informal and even secretive nature of the “industry”. This presentation will discuss what we know and don’t know about NTFP economics, how we got here, and some priorities for future research and policy. This presentation is based on ongoing work for a national assessment of NTFPs through the USDA Forest Service, as well as work on ecosystem service valuation for the Southern Group of State Foresters.

Technical Abstract: Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) are one of many economic benefits that forests provide to society, and understanding their value helps us understand the total economic value of forests. In the early 1990s, economic research on NTFPs in the United States increased, in the Pacific Northwest and other regions including the Southeast, Northeast, and North Central U.S. Research has addressed markets, economic impacts, forest farming returns, recreational collection, and subsistence and personal use. However, a consistent understanding of how NTFPs benefit individuals, communities, and regions across the U.S. has been stymied in large part to the informal and even secretive nature of the “industry”. This presentation will discuss what we know and don’t know about NTFP economics, how we got here, and some priorities for future research and policy. This presentation is based on ongoing work for a national assessment of NTFPs through the USDA Forest Service, as well as work on ecosystem service valuation for the Southern Group of State Foresters.