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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Food and Feed Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336275

Research Project: Identification of the Ecological Niches and Development of Intervention Strategies to Reduce Pathogenic Foodborne Pathogens in Poultry

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Effect of inulin and pectin on physicochemical characteristics and emulsion stability of meat batters

Author
item Silva-vazquez, Ramon - Centro De Investigacio Para Los Recursos Naturales
item Flores-giron, Emmanuel - Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro De Desarrollo De Productos Bioticos (CEPROBI)
item Quintero-ramos, Armando - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Hume, Michael
item Mendez-zamora, Gerardo - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon

Submitted to: CyTA - Journal of Food
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/7/2017
Publication Date: 1/15/2018
Citation: Silva-Vazquez, R., Flores-Giron, E., Quintero-Ramos, A., Hume, M.E., Mendez-Zamora, G. 2018. Effect of inulin and pectin on physicochemical characteristics and emulsion stability of meat batters. CyTA-Journal of Food. 16(1):306-310. https://doi.org/10.1080/19476337.2017.1403490.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/19476337.2017.1403490

Interpretive Summary: The aim of this study was to investigate levels of fibers inulin and pectin replacing pork back fat in meat batters of frankfurter sausage. The addition of 70% pork fat + 15% inulin + 15% pectin reduced pH and improved meat appearance, total color change, and browning index. Adding 70% pork fat + 30% inulin improved appearance, browning index, and water holding capacity, but increased the color change, cooking loss, and total expressible fluid. Treatment with 85% pork fat + 7.5% inulin + 7.5% pectin increased fat exudate in the batters. Results indicate that the addition of 15% inulin and 15% pectin can be used to replace fat without adversely affecting the physical properties of frankfurter sausage meat batter. These results are of interest to producers seeking to reduce fat content in frankfurter sausage while maintaining overall meat quality.

Technical Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate levels of inulin and pectin replacing pork back fat (BF) in meat batters (MB) of frankfurter sausage. Six treatments were evaluated: control (T1), control + 70% BF (T2), control + 85% BF + 15% inulin (T3), control + 70% BF + 30% inulin (T4), control + 85% BF + 7.5% inulin + 7.5% pectin (T5), and control + 70% BF + 15% inulin + 15% pectin (T6). Results indicated that the fibers had effects on meat batters. T6 reduced pH, improved brightness (L*), redness (a*), yellowness (b*), total color change (Delta E), and browning index (BI); T4 decreased a*, b*, BI, and water holding capacity, but increased the Delta E, cooking loss, and total expressible fluid, while T5 increased fat exudate (13.85%) in the batters. The addition of 15% inulin and 15% pectin can be used to replace fat without affecting the physical properties of the meat batter.