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Research Project: Identification of the Ecological Niches and Development of Intervention Strategies to Reduce Pathogenic Foodborne Pathogens in Poultry

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Evaluation of sterilized artificial diets for mass rearing the Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

Author
item Zheng, Le - Texas A&M University
item Crippen, Tawni - Tc
item Dabney, Alan - Texas A&M University
item Gordy, Alex - Texas A&M University
item Tomberlin, Jeffery - Texas A&M University

Submitted to: Journal of Medical Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/4/2017
Publication Date: 9/1/2017
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5832859
Citation: Zheng, L., Crippen, T.L., Dabney, A., Gordy, A., Tomberlin, J.K. 2017. Evaluation of sterilized artificial diets for mass rearing the Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Journal of Medical Entomology. 54(5):1122-1128. https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjx091.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjx091

Interpretive Summary: The impact of six sterilized diets (blood agar, decomposed beef liver, powdered beef liver, powdered fish, milk-based, and a chemically-defined) on fly larvae (Lucilia sericata) reared at three densities (n = 10, 20, and 40) was determined in comparison to a control, fresh beef liver. The effect of these diets on pupal weight, percentage pupation and eclosion, and adult longevity was assessed. L. sericata did not successfully develop on the powdered fish, milk-based, or chemically-defined diets. Overall, the liver-based diets (decomposed and powdered) resulted in the most similar fly development to the control. Larvae reared on blood agar resulted in a significantly increased pupation rate than those reared on the decomposed and powdered beef liver diets. Pupae from larvae fed the fresh beef liver were significantly larger than those reared on the blood agar diet, decomposed beef liver, and powdered beef liver diets. Overall, results revealed larvae reared on sterilized liver-based diets resulted in traits similar to those raised on fresh beef liver. Due to low costs, the sterile liver-based diets could be produced and used with limited infrastructure and economic incomes.

Technical Abstract: The impact of six sterilized diets (blood agar, decomposed beef liver, powdered beef liver, powdered fish, milk-based, and chemically-defined) on Lucilia sericata larvae reared at three densities (n = 10, 20, and 40 per 20 g diet) was determined in comparison to a control (fresh beef liver) diet. Specifically, the effect of these diets on pupal weight, percentage pupation and eclosion, and adult longevity was assessed. The experiment included two biological replicates with five technical replicates in each. L. sericata did not successfully develop on the powdered fish, milk-based, or chemically-defined diets. Overall, the liver-based diets (decomposed and powdered) resulted in the most similar fly development to the control fresh beef liver. Larvae reared on blood agar resulted in a significantly increased (20.56% +/- 8.09%) pupation rate over those reared on the decomposed and powdered beef liver. Pupae from larvae fed the fresh beef liver were significantly larger than those reared on the blood agar diet (6.27 +/- 1.01 mg), decomposed beef liver, and powdered beef liver (4.05 +/- 0.94 mg). Overall, results revealed larvae reared on sterilized liver-based diets resulted in traits similar to those raised on fresh beef liver. Due to low costs, the sterile liver-based diets could be produced and used with limited infrastructure and economic incomes.