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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Cotton Chemistry and Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #333429

Research Project: Chemical Modification of Cotton for Value Added Applications

Location: Cotton Chemistry and Utilization Research

Title: Induction of low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens as potential wound dressing materials

Author
item Edwards, Judson - Vince
item Prevost, Nicolette
item Nam, Sunghyun
item Hinchliffe, Doug
item Condon, Brian
item Yager, Dorne - Virginia Commonwealth University

Submitted to: Journal of Functional Biomaterials
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/23/2017
Publication Date: 3/6/2017
Citation: Edwards, J.V., Prevost, N.T., Nam, S., Hinchliffe, D.J., Condon, B.D., Yager, D. 2017. Low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens: implications for wound healing applications. Journal of Functional Biomaterials. 8(1):1-13. doi:10.3390/jfb8010009.

Interpretive Summary: For centuries bleached and scoured cotton has been employed in wound dressings. However the use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. Wound dressings that generate low levels of H2O2(5-50 micromolar) are thought to be advantageous to wound healing i.e., low level generation of H2O2 (5-50micromolar) is associated with enhanced cell signaling and proliferation in wounds. Here the ability of nonwoven greige cotton to generate H2O2 is contrasted with dressings used in the treatment of chronic wounds. Both brown and white cotton varieties were compared for this purpose and brown cotton was found to have relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation, and demonstrated different capacities for H2O2 generation varying from 1-35 micromolar. The H2O2 generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cotton were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters from field to nonwoven fiber. Non-cellulosic cotton fiber components including metals, pectin, superoxide dismutase and polyphenolics were examined for their role in hydrogen peroxide generation.

Technical Abstract: Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. The components in the cuticle and primary cell wall are mostly removed during the scouring and bleaching process of cotton gauze along with other molecular components including waxes. For centuries bleached and scoured cotton has been employed in wound dressings. However the use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. Wound dressings that generate low levels of H2O2(5-50 micromolar) are thought to be advantageous to wound healing i.e., low level generation of H2O2 (5-50micromolar) is associated with enhanced cell signaling and proliferation in wounds. Here the ability of nonwoven greige cotton to generate H2O2 is contrasted with dressings used in the treatment of chronic wounds. Both brown and white cotton varieties were compared for this purpose and brown cotton was found to have relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation, and demonstrated different capacities for H2O2 generation varying from 1-35 micromolar. The H2O2 generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cotton were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact as observed by transmission electron microscopy and possessed higher pectin levels. Levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics correlated with H2O2 generation.