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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332786

Research Project: Leveraging Remote Sensing, Land Surface Modeling and Ground-based Observations ... Variables within Heterogeneous Agricultural Landscapes

Location: Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory

Title: Impact of aerodynamic resistance formulations used in two-source modeling of energy exchange from the soil and vegetation using land surface temperature

Author
item Kustas, William - Bill
item NIETO, H. - SPANISH NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
item ANDREU, A. - UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY
item CAMMALLERI, C. - COLLABORATOR
item KOOL, D. - BEN GURION UNIVERSITY OF NEGEV
item AGAM, N. - BEN GURION UNIVERSITY OF NEGEV
item Alfieri, Joseph

Submitted to: American Geophysical Union
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/3/2016
Publication Date: 12/10/2016
Citation: Kustas, W.P., Nieto, H., Andreu, A., Cammalleri, C., Kool, D., Agam, N., Alfieri, J.G. 2016. Impact of aerodynamic resistance formulations used in two-source modeling of energy exchange from the soil and vegetation using land surface temperature. American Geophysical Union. https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm16/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/143632.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Application of the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) Model using land surface temperature (LST) requires aerodynamic resistance parameterizations for the flux exchange above the canopy layer, within the canopy air space and at the soil/substrate surface. There are a number of aerodynamic resistance formulations that can be used, based on K-theory or Lagrangian approaches while others are semi-empirical derived from experimental data. These formulations require a within-canopy wind profile model as well as a parameterization for heat transfer from soil surface. The effect of the various parameterization schemes on TSEB output using tower and airborne LST observations over both highly-structured perennial crops, such as orchards and vineyards, and strongly clumped natural vegetation, such as woody savanna and desert shrublands will be presented. The utility of the various aerodynamic resistance formulas for application over these types of canopy architectures will also be discussed along with ongoing efforts to develop more reliable approaches for strongly-clumped and open-canopy environments for partitioning soil and canopy fluxes.